The History of Tootsie Roll Industries

 

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Tootsie Roll Industries

Tootsie logo.png

Type

Public

Traded as

NYSE: TR

Industry

Confectionery

Founded

1896

Headquarters

Chicago, Illinois, USA

Key people

Leo Hirshfield, founder

Melvin Gordon, Former Chairman and CEO

Ellen R. Gordon

(Current President and CEO)[1]

Products

Revenue

Green Arrow .svg$ 528.4M USD (2011)[2]

Operating income

Green Arrow .svg$ 43.9M USD (2011)

 

 

Number of employees

2,200

Website

www.tootsie.com

 

Tootsie Roll Industries is a manufacturer of confectionery in the United States. Its best-known products have been Tootsie Rolls and Tootsie Pops. Tootsie Roll Industries currently markets its brands internationally in Canada, Mexico, and over 75 other countries.[citation needed]

Contents  []

1 History

2 Facilities

3 Brands and products

4 References

5 External links

 

History[]

 

In 1896 its founder Leo Hirshfield, an Austrian immigrant to the United States, started his  business in a small shop located in New York City.[3] He decided he wanted a -tasting  that would not melt in the heat, and that would be an economical artificial alternative to traditional s.[citation needed] He named the  after the nickname of his daughter, Clara "Tootsie" Hirshfield.[3] By 1905, production moved to a five-story factory. In 1917 the name of the company was changed to The Sweets Company of America. The business became a listed company in 1922. In 1931 the Tootsie Pop — a hard- lollipop with Tootsie Roll filling — was invented, and quickly became popular with Dust Bowl refugees during the Depression era because of its low price. During World War II, Tootsie Rolls became a standard part of American soldiers' field rations, due to the hardiness of the  under a variety of environmental conditions.[3]

 

In 1935, the company was in serious difficulty. Its principal splier of paper boxes, Joseph Rubin & Sons of Brooklyn — concerned about the possible loss of an important customer — became interested in the possibility of acquiring control. The company was listed on the New York Stock Exchange, but Bernard D. Rubin acquired a list of shareholders and approached them in person in order to purchase their shares. The Rubins eventually achieved control and agreed that Bernard would run the company as president. Bernard D. Rubin was able to steadily increase sales and restore profits, changing the formula of the Tootsie Roll and increasing its size, moving from Manhattan to a much larger plant in Hoboken, N.J., and guiding the company successfully through the difficult war years when vital raw materials were in short sply. When he died in 1948 he had increased the sales volume twelvefolde. After his death, his brother William B. Rubin became president and remained president until 1962.

 

In 1962, William's daughter, Ellen Rubin Gordon, took control, and as of January 2015, is Chairman and CEO of the company.[2] For many years prior to his death, her husband, Melvin Gordon, was Chairman and CEO from 1962 to 2015.[1]

 

In 1966, the company adopted its current name of "Tootsie Roll Industries, Inc."[4][5][6]

 

The company has acquired several famous brands of confections such as The  Corporation of America's Mason Division (1972), Cella's Confections (1985), The Charms Company (1988), Warner-Lambert's  division (1993; excluding gum and mints), Andes Candies (2000), and Concord Confections (2004).

 

Facilities[]

 

The company's headquarters are located on the South side of Chicago, on the site of the former Tucker Corporation factory. The company has a factory in Mexico City where they produce their famous "Tootsie Pop" lolly-pop  and other  products for the Mexican market as well as for exports to the U.S. and Canada.[citation needed] There are also  factories in Chicago[7] and the Area 4 neighborhood of Cambridge, Massachusetts (belonging to the subsidiary "Cambridge Brands").[8]

 

Brands and products[]

 

Tootsie Roll brands and products include:

Tootsie Rolls and Tootsie Pops

Frooties fruit flavored chewy

Child's Play assorted candies

Dots gumdrops and Crows licorice

Andes  Mints

Charms Blow Pops and Caramel Apple Pops

Sugar Daddy and Sugar Babies caramels

Charleston Chew  bars

Junior Mints

Cella's -covered cherries

Fluffy Stuff cotton

Dubble Bubble, Razzles, and Cry Baby chewing gum

Nik-L-Nip juice confection

Wax Lips flavored wax

Bonomo's Turkish Taffy

 

References[]

 

1.^   to: a b http://www.slate.com/blogs/moneybox/2015/01/21/tootsie_roll_ceo_dies_at_95_we_may_never_know_how_many_licks.html

2.^   to: a b Kesling, Ben (August 22, 2012). "Tootsie's Secret Empire". The Wall Street Journal. pp. B1–B2.

3.^   to: a b c Andrew F. Smith (2006). Encyclopedia of junk food and fast food. Greenwood Publishing Gro. ISBN 0-313-33527-3.  Entry "Tootsie Roll", p 271.

4.  ^ Schlesinger, Hank (2015-02-02). "Melvin Gordon Is Dead At 95; Led Tootsie Roll Industries". Vending Times. Retrieved 2015-02-20.

5.  ^ Watt, Abigail (2015-01-22). "CEO and Chairman of Tootsie Roll Melvin Gordon dies at 95".  Industry. Retrieved 2015-02-20.

6.  ^ Strom, Stephanie (2015-01-21). "Melvin J. Gordon, Who Ran Tootsie Roll Industries, Dies at 95". New York Times. Retrieved 2015-02-20.

7.  ^ http://www.tootsie.com/interactive-timeline/

8.  ^ http://www.waymarking.com/waymarks/WM5KEP_Tootsie_Roll_Candies_Cambridge_Brands_Cambridge_MA

 

External links[]

Tootsie Roll Industries web site

Tootsie's Secret Empire: A CEO in His 90s Helms an Attractive Takeover Target. So What's Next? No One Really Knows (Wall Street Journal profile)

Confectionery products of Tootsie Roll Industries

 Andes  Mints ·

 Caramel Apple Pops ·

 Cella's ·

 Charleston Chew ·

 Charms Blow Pops ·

 Child's Play ·

 Crows ·

 Cry Baby ·

 Dots ·

 Dubble Bubble ·

 Fluffy Stuff ·

 Frooties ·

 Wack-O-Wax Lips ·

 Junior Mints ·

 Nik-L-Nip ·

 Razzles ·

 Sugar Daddy ·

 Sugar Babies ·

 Tootsie Rolls ·

 Tootsie Pops

Categories: Companies listed on the New York Stock Exchange

Confectionery companies of the United States

Tootsie Roll Industries brands

Companies based in Chicago, Illinois

Companies established in 1896

Tootsie Roll

 

For the company, see Tootsie Roll (disambiguation).

 

A patriotic advertisement for Tootsie Rolls during World War I

Tootsie Roll is a  flavored  that has been manufactured in the United States since 1896. The  has qualities similar to both caramels and taffy without being exactly either type, and does not melt while being transported during hot summer months.[1]

The manufacturer, Tootsie Roll Industries, is based in Chicago, Illinois.

It was the first penny  to be individually wrapped.[2]

 

Contents  []

1 History 1.1 Korean War

2 Advertisements 2.1 Captain Tootsie

2.2 Jingle

3 Ingredients

4 Alternate flavors

5 In other countries

6 References

7 External links

 

History[]

A small Tootsie Roll ("Midgee")

 

A large Tootsie Roll log

In 1896, its founder Leo Hirshfield, an Austrian immigrant to the United States of America, started his  business in a small shop located in New York City.

 

In 1935, the company was in serious difficulty. Concerned about the possible loss of an important customer, Tootsie Roll's principal splier of paper boxes, Joseph Rubin & Sons of Brooklyn, became interested in the possibility of acquiring control. The company was listed on the New York Stock Exchange, but Bernard D. Rubin acquired a list of shareholders and approached them in person in order to purchase their shares. The Rubin family eventually achieved control and agreed that Bernard would run the company as president. Bernard D. Rubin was able to steadily increase sales and restore profits, changing the formula of the Tootsie Roll and increasing its size, moving from Manhattan to a much larger plant in Hoboken, New Jersey, and guiding the company successfully through the difficult war years during which vital raw materials were in short sply. When he died in 1948, he had increased the sales volume twelvefold. After his death his brother William B. Rubin served as president until 1962. In 1962, William's daughter, Ellen Rubin Gordon, took control, and as of January 2015, is Chairman and CEO of the company.[3] For many years prior to his death, her husband, Melvin Gordon, was Chairman and CEO.[4]

 

Tootsie Roll Industries is one of the largest  manufacturers in the world. More than 64 million Tootsie Rolls are made daily.[5]

 

According to the company website, the original (and still current) recipe calls for the inclusion of the previous day's batch. "As such, there's (theoretically) a bit of Leo's very first Tootsie Roll in every one of the sixty four million Tootsie Rolls that Tootsie produces each day."[5]

 

Korean War[]

 

During the Battle of Chosin Reservoir in 1950, mortar sections under the United States Marine Corps started to run out of mortar rounds. The radio men of these sections started requesting more rounds. There were too many nearby enemy anti-air emplacements however, and the risk that they might lose any airlifted splies was too great, so they had to wait. After two days of waiting, all the mortar sections ran out of rounds. At this point they accidentally ordered hundreds of crates of Tootsie Roll candies instead of mortar rounds. This was because some elements of the United States military had used "tootsie rolls" as code for mortar rounds. [6]

 

Advertisements[]

 

Captain Tootsie[]

 

Captain Tootsie is an advertisement comic strip created for Tootsie Rolls in 1943 by C C Beck, Peter Costanza and Bill Schreider (1950 onwards). It featured the title character Captain Tootsie and his sidekick, a boy named Rollo, and two other young cohorts named Fatso and Fisty. It had stories in the form of full color one-page Sunday strips, black and white daily strips, and two issues of a comic book of the same title released by Toby Press. The advertisement comic was featured by many publishers and in the newspapers.

 

Within the context of the stories, Captain Tootsie was quite strong and quicker to the punch than any of his enemies. His stories were light and "kid-friendly". B Captain Tootsie's comic strip ads ended in the 1950s.

 

Jingle[]

 

The Tootsie Roll jingle, "Whatever It Is I Think I See," was recorded at Blank Tape Studios, New York in 1976. It is still occasionally played today. It aired on television regularly for more than 20 years, mostly during Saturday morning cartoon programming. The jingle was sung by a nine-year-old girl, Rebecca Jane, and a 13-year-old boy, the children of jazz musicians and friends of the song's composer.[7] The girl still has the original reel-to-reel audio tape recording.[8]

 

Ingredients[]

 

The current U.S. ingredients of a  Tootsie Roll are: sugar, corn syr, partially hydrogenated soybean oil, condensed skim milk, cocoa, whey, soy lecithin, and natural and artificial flavors.[9]

 

In 2009, Tootsie Rolls became certified kosher by the Orthodox Union.[10]

 

Alternate flavors[]

 

In addition to the traditional cocoa-flavored Tootsie Roll, several additional flavors have been introduced. Known as Tootsie Fruit Rolls, flavors include cherry, orange, vanilla, lemon, and lime. These varieties are wrapped in red, orange, blue, yellow and green wrappers, respectively. Tootsie Frooties come in numerous different fruit flavors including red strawberry, blue raspberry, grape, green apple, banana-berry, smooth cherry, fruit punch, pink lemonade, root beer, cran blueberry and watermelon.

 

In other countries[]

 

Tootsie Rolls have been introduced to Canada, Mexico, Ireland, Aruba, United Kingdom, Portugal, Spain, France, Italy, Indonesia, Philippines, South Korea, Panama, Netherlands, Poland, Denmark, Norway, Singapore, Sweden, Finland, Austria, Australia, New Zealand, and Costa Rica.

 

References[]

 

1.  ^ Kawash, Samira (1 February 2010). "? Tootsie Rolls".  Professor.

2.  ^ Manny Fernandez, "Let Us Now Praise the Great Men of Junk Food", New York Times, August 7, 2010.

3.  ^ Kesling, Ben (August 22, 2012). "Tootsie's Secret Empire". The Wall Street Journal. pp. B1–B2.

4.  ^ http://www.slate.com/blogs/moneybox/2015/01/21/tootsie_roll_ceo_dies_at_95_we_may_never_know_how_many_licks.html

5.^   to: a b Welcome to Tootsie – Tootsie Roll Product Information. Tootsie.com (2014-05-04). Retrieved on 2014-06-03.

6.  ^ Veterans remember Chosin Reservoir battle. news-herald.com. Retrieved on 2012-01-03.

7.  ^ Letter from Tootsie Roll Industries Inc. December 5, 1996.

8.  ^ "toostsierollgirl.com". Retrieved 10 October 2014.

9.  ^ "Tootsie Roll Midgees , 12 oz". Walmart. Retrieved 18 October 2012.

10.  ^ Tootsie Roll Goes Kosher. Ou.org (2009-12-02). Retrieved on 2012-01-03.

 

External links[]

Official website

Tootsie Roll Tragedy: The Real Leo Hirschfeld Story

Confectionery products of Tootsie Roll Industries

 Andes  Mints ·

 Caramel Apple Pops ·

 Cella's ·

 Charleston Chew ·

 Charms Blow Pops ·

 Child's Play ·

 Crows ·

 Cry Baby ·

 Dots ·

 Dubble Bubble ·

 Fluffy Stuff ·

 Frooties ·

 Wack-O-Wax Lips ·

 Junior Mints ·

 Nik-L-Nip ·

 Razzles ·

 Sugar Daddy ·

 Sugar Babies ·

 Tootsie Rolls ·

 Tootsie Pops

  Tootsie Pop

 

Tootsie Pops[1] are hard  lollipops filled with -flavored chewy Tootsie Roll. They were invented in 1931 by Lukas R. "Luke" Weisgram, an employee of The Sweets Company of America. The company changed its name to Tootsie Roll Industries in 1969.

 

The  debuted to the public in 1931. In addition to  (the original flavor), Tootsie Pops come in cherry, orange, caramel, grape, raspberry, strawberry, watermelon, blue raspberry,  cane (seasonal), and now, pomegranate, banana, blueberry, and green apple flavors. Another release of Tootsie Roll Pops, named Tropical Stormz, features six swirl-textured flavors: orange pineapple, lemon lime, strawberry banana, apple blueberry, citrus punch, and berry berry punch.

 

In 2002, 60,000,000 Tootsie Rolls and twenty million Tootsie Pops were produced every day.[2]

 

Contents  []

1 Development

2 Commercials

3 Rumors and set attempts for Tootsie Pop

4 Flavors 4.1 Original Assortment

4.2 "Tropical Stormz" Assortment (Discontinued)

4.3 "Wild Berry" Assortment

4.4 Non-Standard Flavors

4.5 Seasonal Flavors

5 Sister Products

6 References

7 External links

 

Development[]

 

At an office meeting employees were asked to share any ideas for new candies. Mr. Weisgram had been thinking beforehand. Just the other day, Clara, his daughter, had shared a lick of her lollipop, and at the same time, Weisgram had a Tootsie Roll in his mouth. He thought about how good it tasted and  popped an idea. The board loved his idea and began to plan for the creation of this new . Committees were formed and changes made until finally everything was ready. Tootsie Pops are produced  to this day and additional flavors are added once every while.[citation needed]

 

Commercials[]

 

Tootsie Pops are known for the catch phrase "How many licks does it take to get to the Tootsie Roll center of a Tootsie Pop?". The phrase was first introduced in an animated commercial which debuted on U.S. television in 1969.[3] In the original television ad, a questioning boy poses the question to a cow, a fox, a turtle and an owl. Each one of the first three animals tells the boy to ask someone else, explaining that they'd bite a Tootsie Pop every time they lick one. Eventually, he asks the owl, who starts licking it, but bites into the lollipop after only three licks, much to the chagrin of the boy, who gets the empty stick back. The commercial ends the same way, with various flavored Tootsie Pops unwrapped and being "licked away" until being crunched in the center.[4]

 

While the original commercial is 60 seconds long, an ed 30-second version and 15-second version of this commercial are the ones that have aired innumerable times over the years. The dialogue to the 60-second version is as follows:

Questioning Boy (Buddy Foster): Mr. Cow...Mr. Cow (Frank Nelson): Yeeeeesss!!?Questioning Boy: How many licks does it take to get to the Tootsie Roll center of a Tootsie Pop?!Mr. Cow: I don't know, I always end  biting. Ask Mr. Fox, for he's much cleverer than I.Questioning Boy: Mr. Fox, how many licks does it take to get to the Tootsie Roll center of a Tootsie Pop?!!Mr. Fox (Paul Frees): Why don't you ask Mr. Turtle, for he's been around a lot longer than I! Me, heheh, I bite!Questioning Boy: Mr. Turtle, how many licks does it take to get to the Tootsie Roll center of a Tootsie Pop?Mr. Turtle (Ralph James): I've never even made it without biting. Ask Mr. Owl, for he is the wisest of us all.Questioning Boy: Mr. Owl, how many licks does it take to get to the Tootsie Roll center of a Tootsie Pop!?Mr. Owl (Paul Winchell): A good question. Let's find out. (He takes the Tootsie pop and starts licking) A One... A two-HOO... A tha-three..(crunch sound effect)Mr. Owl: A Three!Questioning Boy: If there's anything I can't stand, it's a smart owl.Narrator (Herschel Bernardi): How many licks does it take to get to the Tootsie Roll center of a Tootsie Pop?(crunch sound effect)Narrator: The world may never know.

In the shorter 30-second ad, Mr. Owl returns the spent  stick, and the boy's final line is replaced with a reaction shot and a beat of silence.[5][6] The 30-second commercial dialogue is as follows:

Questioning Boy: Mr. Turtle, how many licks does it take to get to the Tootsie Roll center of a Tootsie Pop?Mr. Turtle: I've never even made it without biting. Ask Mr. Owl.Questioning Boy: Mr. Owl, how many licks does it take to get to the Tootsie Roll center of a Tootsie Pop?Mr. Owl: Let's find out. A One... A.two-HOO...A three..(crunch sound effect)Mr. Owl: A Three!Narrator: How many licks does it take to get to the Tootsie Roll center of a Tootsie Pop?(crunch sound effect)Narrator: The world may never know.

The 15-second commercial (which still airs today) only shows the boy with Mr. Owl and a different narrator (Frank Leslie) speaks the same above line, but without the scene showing the Tootsie Roll pops slowly disappearing with a different tune playing in the background. The question still stands unanswered.[7] The dialogue is as follows:

Questioning Boy: Mr. Owl, how many licks does it take to get to the Tootsie Roll center of a Tootsie Pop?Mr. Owl: Let's find out. A One... A.two-HOO...A three..(crunch sound effect)Narrator (Frank Leslie): How many licks does it take to get to the center of a Tootsie Pop? The world may never know.

After the commercial, Mr. Owl became the mascot for Tootsie Roll Pops, appearing in marketing campaigns and on the packaging.

 

In the 1990s, a new commercial was made featuring a boy asking a robot and a dragon how many licks it takes to get to the center, with the Tootsie Pops known for the catch phrase "How many licks to the center of a Tootsie Pop?", rather than "How many licks does it take to get to the Tootsie Roll center of a Tootsie Pop?".[8]

 

In the early 1970s, Tootsie Pops were the initial lollipop of choice of the titular character in the TV series Kojak, and are seen prominently beginning in the December 12, 1973 episode "Dark Sunday" when Lt. Theo Kojak decides to favor them instead of cigarettes.

 

Rumors and set attempts for Tootsie Pop[]

 

At some point, a rumor began that the lollipop wrappers which bore three unbroken circles were redeemable for free  or even free items like shirts and other items. The rumor was untrue, but some shops have honored the wrapper offer over the years, allowing people to "win" a free pop.

 

Some stores redeemed lollipop wrappers with the "shooting star"(bearing an image of a child dressed as a Native American aiming a bow and arrow at a star) for a free sucker. This was clearly  to the store owner and not driven by the lollipop manufacturer.[9] One convenience store in Iowa City, Iowa, for example, gave  away when the children asked. Also in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Osco Drug used to give children free suckers for star wrappers. In 1994, the owner of Dan’s Shortstop told a reporter that when he first opened children came by often, but after a while, he said he had to stop giving stuff away. Giveaways also occurred in Chico, California, where a 7-Eleven store manager in the Pleasant Valley area, said she had to stop because it had become too expensive.[10] Since 1982, Tootsie Roll Industries has been distributing a short story, The Legend of the Indian Wrapper, to children who mail in their Indian star wrappers as a "consolation prize".[11]

 

A student study at the University of Cambridge concluded that it takes 3,481 licks to get to the center of a Tootsie Pop.[12] Another study by Purdue University concluded that it takes an average of 364 licks to get to the center of a Tootsie Pop using a "licking machine", while it takes an average of 252 licks when tried by 20 volunteers.[citation needed] Yet another study by the University of Michigan concluded that it takes 411 licks to get to the center of a Tootsie Pop. A 1996 study by undergraduate students at Swarthmore College concluded that it takes a median of 144 licks (range 70–222) to get to the center of a Tootsie Pop.[13] Nolan Walker personally found that it takes 1,139 licks as documented in a home experiment on December, 1997.[14] Harvard Grad students created a rotating mechanical tongue and concluded it took 2255 licks.[citation needed] It took 2256 licks on one attempt for a normal raspberry Tootsie Pop to get the center showing. YouTube star Ryan Higa found out that it took 700 licks to get to the center of the Tootsie Pop.[15]

 

In 2014 the Tribology Laboratory at the University of Florida published a study examining the coled effects of biology, corrosion, and mechanical agitation on the wear of Tootsie Roll Pops. Self reported wear data from 58 participants was used in conjunction with statistical analysis of actual lollipop cross-sectional information in a numerical simulation to compute the average number of licks required to reach the Tootsie Roll center of a Tootsie Roll Pop. The number of licks required to reach the center, based on equatorial cross-section data, was found to be nearly independent of the licking style with the one-sided approach requiring 195±18 licks and the full-surface approach requiring 184±33. Detailed examination of the lollipops indicates that the minimum  shell thickness is rarely (if ever) located along the equator. Using the global minimum distance resulted in a calculated 130±29 licks to reach the center, independent of licking style.[16]

 

Flavors[]

 

Original Assortment[]

Orange

Raspberry

Grape

Cherry

Lemon (discontinued but reintroduced 2015)

 

willey wonka All assortment flavors can also be purchased in single-flavor bulk. In 2004, and again in 2011 with different flavors, Tootsie Pops would have a random, rotating sixth flavor.

 

"Tropical Stormz" Assortment (Discontinued)[]

Cake Mix

Taco Bell's Fire

Citrus Punch

Berry Punch

Coconut Apple

Mango-Pineapple

"Wild Berry" Assortment[]

Wild Apple Berry

Wild Blueberry

Wild Black Cherry

Wild Cherry Berry

Wild Mango Berry

Non-Standard Flavors[]

Banana (Rotated as a "Sixth Flavor" in 2011)

Pomegranate (Rotated as a "Sixth Flavor" in 2012)

Blueberry (Rotated as a "Sixth Flavor" in 2011)

Lemon-Lime (Rotated as a "Sixth Flavor" in 2004)

Blue Raspberry (Rotated as a "Sixth Flavor" in 2004)

Watermelon (Rotated as a "Sixth Flavor" in 2004)

Strawberry (Rotated as a "Sixth Flavor" in 2004)

 

Non-standard flavors can be now purchased in single-flavor bulk.

Additional flavors: Strawberry-Vanilla, Cherry (Valentine's Day), Tangerine, Pineapple, Tropical Punch and Strawberry Watermelon.

Seasonal Flavors[]

Cane (Christmas seasonal flavor, also available as Pop Drops)

Caramel (Halloween seasonal flavor but seems to be sold all year)

 

Sister Products[]

Tootsie Rolls - The original Tootsie  that Tootsie Pops were based from.

Tootsie Pop Drops - Smaller Tootsie Pops without the stick, made to be portable and often sold in a pocket package.[17] Pop Drops Assortment: Cherry, Orange and Grape

Cane Pop Drops (seasonal)

 

Caramel Apple Pops - Similar to Tootsie Pops (hard  apple shell with chewy caramel center) but flatter. Caramel Apple Pops (Original Flavor: Green Apple aka Granny Smith)

Caramel Apple Orchard Pops (Three Flavors: Red Macintosh, Green Apple, Golden Delicious)

 

Charms Blow Pops - Tootsie Pops with gum in the center instead of a Tootsie Roll Charms Blow Pops Assortment: Cherry, Sour Apple, Grape, Watermelon, Strawberry, Blue Raspberry

Ser Blow Pops

Blow Pops Minis

Way-2-Sour Blow Pops

 

 

References[]

 

1.  ^ "Welcome to Tootsie – Product Information – Tootsie Pops: Original". Tootsie.com. 2010-05-22. Retrieved 2010-11-29.

2.  ^ Aaseng, Nathan. Business Builders in Sweets & Treats. Minneapolis: Oliver Press, 2005, ISBN 978-1-881508-84-7, p. 108.

3.  ^ Tootsie Gallery: How Many Licks Does It Take?

4.  ^ Watch the original commercial

5.  ^ Sixty-second ad (alternate version)

6.  ^ 30-second version

7.  ^ 15-second ad (short version)

8.  ^ Watch the sequel commercial

9.  ^ A Tootsie Pop Mystery: The Tootsie Pop Indian Wrapper from About.com

10.  ^ "The Wrapper".

11.  ^ "The Legend of the Indian Wrapper" (PDF).

12.  ^ how many licks does it take to get to the center of a tootsie pop from Wolfram|Alpha

13.  ^ "The Tootsie Project". Kathryn A. Zyla. 1996-04-09. Retrieved 2011-01-15.

14.  ^ "1,139 licks to the center of a Tootsie Roll Tootsie Pop". Nolan Walker. December 1997.

15.  ^ "Rap God (Dear Ryan)". NigaHiga. 2014-03-14. Retrieved 2014-04-28.

16.  ^ Sawyer, W.G. (2014). "Lessons from the Lollipop: Biotribology, Tribocorrosion, and Irregular Surfaces". Tribology Letters.

17.  ^ http://www.snackmemory.com/tootsie-pop-drops/

 

External links[]

Official page on Tootsie Pops from the manufacturer

Confectionery products of Tootsie Roll Industries

 Andes  Mints ·

 Caramel Apple Pops ·

 Cella's ·

 Charleston Chew ·

 Charms Blow Pops ·

 Child's Play ·

 Crows ·

 Cry Baby ·

 Dots ·

 Dubble Bubble ·

 Fluffy Stuff ·

 Frooties ·

 Wack-O-Wax Lips ·

 Junior Mints ·

 Nik-L-Nip ·

 Razzles ·

 Sugar Daddy ·

 Sugar Babies ·

 Tootsie Rolls ·

 Tootsie Pops

 

Categories: Brand name confectionery

Tootsie Roll Industries brands

1931 introductions

 

Lollipops

 

 

Dots ()

This article is about the gumdrops. For the dots on a strip of paper, see  Buttons.

Dots

Dots, or Mason Dots (trademarked DOTS), are a brand of gum drops marketed by Tootsie Roll Industries, which claims that "since its 1945 launch," the  has become "America's...#1 selling gumdrop brand."[1] According to advertisements, more than four billion dots are produced from the Tootsie Roll Industries Chicago plant each year.[2]

 

According to PETA, Dots are vegan,[3] and according to the Tootsie Roll Industries website, they are gluten-free, nut-free, peanut-free, and kosher[4] (officially certified kosher by the Orthodox Union as of December 1, 2009).[5][6]

Contents  []

1 History

2 Flavors and varieties 2.1 Flavors

2.2 Varieties 2.2.1 Halloween specialties

2.2.2 Other Holiday specialties

2.2.3 Other varieties and flavors

3 References

 

 

History[]

 

Dots were introduced in 1945 by Mason and trademarked that year. In 1972, Tootsie Roll Industries acquired the Dots brand by purchasing the Mason Division of  Corporation of America. Prior to that acquisition they were manufactured by Mason, AU and Magenheimer Confectionery Manufacturing Company of Brooklyn and later Mineola, New York.[1][7]

 

Crows are the oldest  in the Dots family, first created in the late 19th century.[1] Original dots date back to 1945, Tropical Dots to 2003, and Yogurt Dots to 2007.[1] Sour Dots were introduced in 2009-2010.[citation needed]

 

Flavors and varieties[]

 

Flavors[]

 

Current flavors for "original dots" include cherry (red), lemon (yellow), lime (green), and orange (orange).[1] Sour Dots have five flavors, but are created with a sour sugar: cherry, lemon, orange, grape, and green apple. Flavors for Tropical Dots include Island Nectar, Wild Mango, Grapefruit Cooler, Carambola Melon, and Paradise Punch; and for Yogurt Dots, Banana, Orange, Blackberry, and Lemon-Lime.[1]

 

Crows, black licorice flavored gum drops, are also considered to be part of the Dots family, created in the 1890s by confectioners Ernest Von Au and Joseph Maison. There is an urban legend that crows were to be called "Black Rose," but the printer misheard the name as "Black Crows" and printed wrappers with the wrong name on them.[8] However, research—including the fact that the name was copyrighted before the candies ever came with wrappers—reveals that this story is not true.[8]

 

Varieties[]

 

In addition to current varieties of Original Dots (also known as Mason Dots), Tropical Dots, Yogurt Dots, Sour Dots, and Crows, past varieties (including special short-term promotional offerings) have included:

 

 

Ghost Dots are translucent light green, with the same flavors of Original Dots, but without the different colors to indicate which flavor any particular gum drop might have.

Bat Dots are black-colored Dots that are blood orange flavored.

Corn Dots are  corn flavored and resemble  corn.

Other Holiday specialties[]

Other holiday specialties have included:[citation needed]

Christmas Dots, which have a Vanilla (white) top with either a Cherry (red) or Lime (green) base

Valentine Dots, which have a Vanilla (white) base with either a Cherry (red) or Passion Fruit (pink) top

Easter Dots in Blueberry (blue), Lemon (yellow), Lime (green), Cherry (red), and Orange (orange) (introduced in 2010)

 

Other varieties and flavors[]

 

Other varieties and flavors have included:[citation needed]

Wild Berry Dots were introduced in 2000. Wild Berry Dots are sweet, chewy gumdrops coated with a tart, crunchy coating. Wild Berry Dots were discontinued in 2007.

Dots Elements in pomegranate (earth, purple), cinnamon (fire, red), green tea (water, green), and wintergreen (air, teal) (introduced in 2008, no longer being produced)

Hot Dots (aka Cinnamon Dots) were released in 2004 but were discontinued in 2006.

Patriotic Dots, which have a vanilla (white) top with either a strawberry (red) or blueberry (blue) base

During the 1980s, there was a variety of Dots called Spice Dots

Special individual flavor packages such as Pink Grapefruit, Peach, and Watermelon. Marketed as "sour slices," they maintain the gumdrop shape of all other Dots.[2][10][11][12]

 

References[]

 

1.^   to: a b c d e f Tootsie Roll Industries - Mason DOTS / Mason Crows

2.^   to: a b www.warehouse.com, advertisement for DOTS, retrieved November 1, 2011.

3.  ^ PETA website retrieved October 31, 2011.

4.  ^ Tootsie roll website, health and nutrition section, retrieved October 31, 2011.

5.  ^ News and press release section of tootsie.com, retrieved October 31, 2011.

6.  ^ Orthodox Union press release, December 2, 2009, retrieved November 1, 2011.

7.  ^ information on Mason, AU, and Magenheimer Confectionery Manufacturing Company, retrieved November 1, 2011.

8.^   to: a b professor.com page describing Black Crows , retrieved October 31, 2011.

9.  ^ blog.net page on Halloween dots, retrieved November 1, 2011.

10.  ^ watermelon dots description, warehouse.com, retrieved November 1, 2011.

11.  ^ peach dots description, warehouse.com, retrieved November 1, 2011.

12.  ^ pink grapefruit dots description, warehouse.com, retrieved November 1, 2011.

 

 

Charms Blow Pops

Product type

Confectionery

Owner

Tootsie Roll Industries

Introduced

1969

Previous owners

Charms

 

Charms Blow Pops are lollipops with bubble gum centers surrounded by a hard  shell. The  was popularized by The Charms Company. Invention of the  is attributed to Thomas Tate Tidwell in 1969, with the patent issued in November 1969.[1] The  was originally manufactured by the Triple T  Company (Atlanta, Georgia) and sold under the brand name "Triple Treat." The new brand name, "Charms Blow Pops," was introduced in 1973.[2] Blow Pops became the Charms  Company’s best-selling product of all time.

 

In 1988, the Charms  Company was sold to the Tootsie Roll Company. With the addition of Blow Pops to their product line which included Tootsie Pops, the Tootsie Roll Company became the largest lollipop manufacturer in the world.

 

Walter W. Reid Jr. founded the Charms  Company in 1912. The company was originally called Tropical Charms, a reference to the individually wrapped square shaped hard candies, which were one of the first to be individually wrapped in cellophane.

 

Tropical Charms was founded in Bloomfield, New Jersey. The company name was eventually shortened to Charms.

 

During World War II, the U.S. Army began including Charms candies in combat rations as a splemental energy form. That tradition has continued with a few interrtions.

 

After the war, Walter Reid III, the son of the founder, took control of the company and made it the leading producer of hard  in the world. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, the company developed the Charms Blow Pop…the first bubble gum filled lollipop in the world.

 

The company was led by Reid III, Ross B. Cameron Sr. (Walter W. Reid Jr.’s son-in-law) and his two sons, Ross B. Cameron Jr. and Reid B. Cameron.

 

The Charms  Company moved its manufacturing plant from Bloomfield, NJ to Freehold, New Jersey in 1973. The company eventually purchased and built a state-of-the-art manufacturing plant in Covington, Tennessee, which is currently still being used to produce Charms candies.

 

Blow Pops became the company’s best-selling product of all time.

 

Besides the Blow Pop, the  company produced Charms Squares, Sweet & Sour Pops, Sour Balls and many other smaller  projects.

 

References[]

 

1.  ^ US patent 3477394, Thomas T. Tidwell et al, "Method for making  with gum inside"

2.  ^ "Charms Blow Pops".  Crate.com.  Crate, Inc. Retrieved 9 June 2012.

 

Wax lips

 

A pair of Wack-O-Wax lips

Wax Lips are the common name of a  product made of colored and flavored wax, molded to resemble a pair of oversized red lips. The lips have a bite plate in the back; when the plate is held between the teeth, the wax lips cover the wearer's own lips, to comic effect. Invented by the American  Company in the early 20th century, they became a popular novelty in the United States for many decades, especially during the Halloween season. Their popularity among children can be attributed mainly to the comedy of wearing the lips. Although they were intended to be used as a sort of chewing gum after the novelty of the gag wore off, the lips were often simply discarded rather than eaten.

 

The original design of wax lips is proprietary. The patent was obtained by Concord Confections, Ltd. in 2002, and that company was in turn acquired by Tootsie Roll Industries in 2004. The lips are now produced under the Wack-O-Wax brand name. Other designs include the wax fangs design, which depicts open lips with a mouthful of bloody vampire teeth, black wax moustaches, and lips with protruding buck teeth.

 

Although their popularity waned during the late 20th century, Concord Confections continue to produce wax lips in limited quantities.

 

References[]

Wack-O-Wax at Tootsie Roll Industries American Oil and Gas Historial Society Invention of Paraffin leads to Wax Lips Favorites.com AMERICA'S OLEAGINOUS AFFECTATION - WAX LIPS

 

Junior Mints

"Junior Mint" redirects here. For the Seinfeld episode, see The Junior Mint.

A box of Junior Mints

The  itself

 

Junior Mints are a  brand consisting of small rounds of mint filling (with a dimple on one side) inside a dark  coating. The product is currently produced by Tootsie Roll Industries, and is packaged in varying amounts from the fun-size box to the much larger 12.0 oz. box.

 

Junior Mints were introduced in 1949 by the Cambridge, Massachusetts-based James O. Welch Company. The company also manufactured candies and  bars such as Sugar Babies, Welch's Fudge, and Pom Poms.

 

Welch was born in Hertford, North Carolina, attended the University of North Carolina, and then founded his Cambridge  company in 1927. His partner in the company was his brother, Robert W. Welch, Jr., who retired from the confectionery business in 1956 and two years later founded the John Birch Society.[1]

 

 

 

Contents  []

1 Origin of product name

2 Today

3 In popular culture 3.1 Sport

3.2 Music

3.3 Internet, TV and films

3.4 Books

4 See also

5 References

6 External links

 

 

Origin of product name[]

 

The name of the product is a pun on Sally Benson's Junior Miss, a collection of her stories from The New Yorker, which were adapted by Jerome Chodorov and Joseph Fields into a successful play. The play was directed by Moss Hart and ran on Broadway from 1941 to 1943. According to one past official company history, when James Welch developed and launched the product in 1949, he named the  after his favorite Broadway show. Yet the  came six years after the play had closed on Broadway. Current copy on the Junior Mints box incorrectly gives the date of the Broadway play as 1949. Some may argue that this is comparable to the "potato potato" scenario, as depending on how you read "named after a top Broadway play in 1949: "Junior Miss"", it may be interpreted that it is simply referring to the  being named in 1949.[2][3]

 

In 1945, the play was adapted to film, with George Seaton directing Peggy Ann Garner in the lead role. The Junior Miss radio series, starring Barbara Whiting, was being broadcast weekly on CBS at the time Junior Mints were first marketed in 1949. Thus, Welch had cleverly created a product sold at movie theater concession stands and identified with a specific movie and radio series and displaying a name that sounded almost exactly like that property–yet different enough that it avoided any fees for licensing and merchandising. Junior Mints quickly became a popular  at movie concession stands, and one product in the line is the three oz. box marketed as the "Theater Size Junior Mints Concession ".

 

In 1963, the brand was acquired by Nabisco, who sold the brand to Warner-Lambert Company (now part of Pfizer) in 1988, who in turn sold the brand to Tootsie Roll in 1993. Today, Junior Mints are still manufactured in the Area 4 neighborhood of Cambridge at Tootsie Roll Industries.

 

Today[]

 

Over 15 million Junior Mints are produced daily. Tootsie Roll also makes Junior Caramels (caramel filling with a milk  coating) and limited ion "Inside Outs" (mint- filling with a white  shell). Other limited ion Junior Mints include Valentine's Day Pastels/Valentine's Day Regulars (not pastel), Easter Pastels, Christmas ion (featuring red and green fillings), and Christmas Peppermint Crunch ion (featuring crunchy peppermint flakes in the outer  coating). Junior Mints are sold in various amounts from the fun-size boxes to the movie theater-size boxes, since the product continues to sell well in movie theaters. Junior Mints have traveled throughout the world. They are now certified kosher dairy by the Orthodox Union.[4]

 

In 2009, Tootsie Roll introduced a companion product - "Junior Mints Deluxe". The "Deluxe" is a larger dark  covered mint that comes foil wrapped (much like a  covered cherry) and is sold in various quantity boxes - 10, 22, and a 72 piece box with a fold  sign, designed for individual piece sale on retail counter tops.

 

In popular culture[]

 

Sport[]

 

New England Patriots Head Coach Bill Belichick, answering fan questions via the Twitter account of his girlfriend Linda Holliday on 12 March 2013, described Junior Mints as his favorite sweet treat.[5]

 

Music[]

 

On the title track of Fruitcakes, an album released in May 1994 by American popular music singer-songwriter Jimmy Buffett, Buffet expresses extreme frustration by the disappearance of Junior Mints from the concession counter of modern cineplex theaters.

 

The  is mentioned in the lyrics to the track "Eiffel Tower High" by the American band Hüsker Dü off of their 1986 album,  Apple Grey.

 

The  is also mentioned in "cold shower tuesdays" by the American band Bowling For So.

 

Internet, TV and films[]

 

Junior Mints were prominently featured in an episode of Seinfeld titled "The Junior Mint". While observing the surgery of Elaine's ex-boyfriend Roy, Kramer offers a Junior Mint to Jerry, who refuses the offer—to which Kramer later states, "Who's gonna turn down a Junior Mint? It's , it's peppermint; it's delicious!"—and the two accidentally drop it into the retracted abdominal cavity below. After Roy's condition deteriorates, Jerry calls the hospital intending to confess the whole situation, only to discover that Roy's condition has improved. The doctor attributes the miraculous recovery to "something beyond science — something, perhaps, from above." In reality, a York Peppermint Pattie was used because Junior Mints were too small to be filmed.

 

Junior Mints are also referred to in the season three episode "That Special Tug" Two and a Half Men.

 

In Family Guy episode "We Love You, Conrad", Brian's ex-girlfriend Jillian shows Peter Griffin her iPod, which turns out to be a small box of Junior Mints.

 

In Knight and Day Tom Cruise says he can dismantle bombs using a safety pin and a Junior Mint when Cameron Diaz asks how she got in to a bikini whilst being unconscious.

 

In The Justice League Recombination episode of The Big Bang Theory, Rajesh Koothrappali (unsuccessfully) proposes Junior Mints as an alternative to Sheldon Cooper's assertion that Milk Duds, with their self-deprecating name and remarkably mild flavor, are the most apologetic of boxed candies.

 

Books[]

 

The 2006 Augusten Burroughs book Possible Side Effects contains a chapter, "Mint Threshold", about the author's experience creating an advertising campaign for Junior Mints.

 

In the novel I'd Tell You I Love You, But Then I'd Have to Kill You, the protagonist's friend suggests Junior Mints as the best  to buy during a date, which is then declared to be the perfect movie .

 

In Fannie Flagg's bestseller Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe (1987), Evelyn brings Junior Mints to share with her friend Mrs. Threadgoode.

 

In Sarah Dessen's book "Dreamland" Junior Mints are mentioned in Chapter 7 when her boyfriend tells her to "shut  and eat your Junior Mints."

 

In Michael Grant's book "Hunger", Junior Mints are mentioned several times; most notably when Bug steals them and when they become a part of Sam's dream.

 

See also[]

List of  bar brands

 

References[]

 

1.  ^ "James O. Welch Dies at 79; Founder of  Company", The New York Times, February 1, 1985.

2.  ^ Smith, Andrew F. Encyclopedia of Junk Food and Fast Food. Greenwood Publishing, 2006.

3.  ^ Junior Mints box copy

4.  ^ https://www.oudirect.org/public/public_ukdDisplayDetails.aspx?UKD_id=OUD3-447A449

5.  ^ http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap1000000150188/article/bill-belichick-makes-surprising-twitter-cameo

 

Junior Mints official site

Sugar Daddy ()

-Sugar-Daddy-Wrapper-Small.jpg

An unwrapped Large Pop

Sugar Daddy is a  bar on a stick manufactured by Tootsie Roll Industries. A bite-sized  based on the Sugar Daddy is marketed under the name Sugar Babies.

 

Sugar Daddy was invented in 1925 by a  salesman named Robert Welch at the James O. Welch Company. Sugar Daddy was originally called the Papa Sucker. The name was changed to Sugar Daddy in 1932. Sugar Babies were introduced three years later, in 1935.[1] A -covered version, the Sugar Mama was produced from 1965 to the 1980s.

 

The James O. Welch Company was purchased by the National Biscuit Company (Nabisco, now Mondelēz International) in 1963. The Welch brands were sold to Warner-Lambert in 1988; Tootsie Roll Industries acquired them in 1993. The Tootsie Roll Industries now makes Sugar Daddy candies.[2]

 

Today, Sugar Daddy candies are produced in two standard sizes, the Junior Pop, with 53 kcal, and the Large Pop, with 200 kcal; and two seasonal (Valentines and Christmas) Giant sizes,[3] 1/2 Lb with 964 kcal, and 1 Lb with 1928 kcal.[4]

 

References[]

 

1.  ^ Smith, Andrew (March 2007). The Oxford Companion to American Food and Drink. New York, New York: Oxford University Press. p. 591. ISBN 0-19-530796-8.

2.  ^ Kimmerle, Beth (November 2003). : The Sweet History. Collectors Press, Inc. p. 156. ISBN 1-888054-83-2.

3.  ^ http://www.tootsie.com/products.php?pid=162

4.  ^ http://www.tootsie.com/health.php?pid=162

 

 

Sugar Babies ()

This article is about Sugar Babies.

Sugar Babies are bite-sized, pan-coated, chewy milk caramel sweets which are relatively soft to chew. They are an American confection originally developed in 1935 by the James O. Welch Co. Sugar Babies were named after a song called "Let Me Be Your Sugar Baby."[1]

 

The company was purchased by the National Biscuit Company (Nabisco, now Kraft Foods) in 1963. "The Welch family of products changed hands a few more times, going from Nabisco to Warner-Lambert [in 1988] then to Tootsie in 1993, who makes them to this day."[2] Tootsie Roll Industries now makes Sugar Babies.[3] Welch produced them along with the rest of the Sugar Family (Sugar Daddy and Sugar Mama). The  Blog rated Sugar Babies as a 9 out of 10 ("yummy")[2]

 

References[]

 

1.  ^ Smith, Andrew (March 2007). The Oxford Companion to American Food and Drink. New York, New York: Oxford University Press. p. 591. ISBN 0-19-530796-8.

2.^   to: a b "Sugar Babies". April 25, 2007. Retrieved August 2, 2014.

3.  ^ Kimmerle, Beth (November 2003). : The Sweet History. Collectors Press, Inc. p. 156. ISBN 1-888054-83-2.

 

 

 

 

This page was last modified on 19 December 2015, at 03:23.

Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., a non-profit organization.