The History of The Orkla Group

 

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Orkla ASA

Orkla.svg

Type

Allmennaksjeselskap

Traded as

OSE: ORK

Industry

Conglomerate

Founded

1654

Headquarters

Oslo, Norway (formally registered in Sarpsborg)

Key people

Peter Arne Ruzicka (President and CEO), Stein Erik Hagen (Chairman)

Products

Branded consumer goods, aluminium products, financial investments

Revenue

NOK 33 billion (2013)[1]

Operating income

NOK 3.163 billion (2013)[1]

Number of employees

30,000 (end 2011)[1]

Subsidiaries

Borregaard, Sapa, various branded consumer goods companies

Website

www.orkla.com

 

Orkla is a Norwegian conglomerate operating in the Nordic region, Eastern Europe, Asia and the US. At present, Orkla operates in the branded consumer goods, aluminium solutions and financial investment sectors. The company's strategic focus is on growth in its branded consumer goods operations. The group has 30,000 employees in more than 40 countries and a turnover of NOK 61 billion.

 

Contents  [hide]

1 Operations

2 History

3 Brands 3.1 Orkla Foods

3.2 Orkla Confectionary & Snacks

3.3 Orkla Home & Personal 3.3.1 Lilleborg

3.3.2 Orkla Health

3.3.3 Pierre Robert Group

3.4 Orkla Food Ingredients

4 Other investments

5 References

6 External links

Operations[]

 

Orkla's branded consumer goods division produces brands in many fields, primarily in the Nordic region, but also in other places, especially in the Central and Eastern European countries, Russia and the Baltic region. Among the companies owned by Orkla are Abba Seafood, Beauvais foods, Chips, Felix Abba, Göteborgs Kex, Kalev, KiMs, Lilleborg, MTR Foods, Rasoi Magic, Peter Möller, Nidar, OLW, Procordia Food, Stabburet, Sætre, Pierre Robert Group Sapa, Borregaard and Laima (confectioner).

 

Borregaard is a Norwegian chemical company with products within wood based chemicals and other organic chemicals.

Sapa Group is a Swedish-based company that produces high value-added profiles, building systems and heat transfer strips in aluminium. Sapa Group's aluminium profiles business was in 2007 merged with Alcoa's, almost doubling Sapa's turnover. In 2009 Alcoa took over all aluminium activities from Elkem while Sapa Group took over the profile business from Alcoa. The same year Sapa Group took over bankrupt Indalex in USA and Canada.

As of March 2009, Orkla had major ownerships in Jotun (42.5%) and Renewable Energy Corporation (39.73%).

History[]

Orkla started out in 1654 with pyrite mining at Løkken Verk in Sør-Trøndelag, Norway. Later the company also started mining copper, but the copper mining was abandoned in 1845. In 1904 Orkla Grube-Aktiebolag was founded by Christian Thams to start commercial mining at Løkken Verk, including the construction of Thamshavnbanen, the first electric railway in Norway, between Løkken Verk and Thamshavn. This railway is still operated as a museum railway after the mining operations at Løkken Verk were closed on 10 July 1987.

 

In 1929, Orkla became listed on Oslo Stock Exchange and in 1931 the new smelting plant at Thamshavn outside Orkanger is opened. By 1941 Orkla started with a separate investments portfolio, and opened offices in Oslo in 1975. In 1984 Orkla started a major takeover of Norwegian newspapers, creating Orkla Media as one of the three largest media companies in Norway. Half of the magazine publisher Egmont-Mortensen is added to Orkla Media in 1992 and the Danish Det Berlingske Officin[2] in 2000. Orkla sold the media section to Mecom in 2006.[3]

 

In 1986 Orkla merged with Borregaard based in Sarpsborg to form Orkla Borregaard. The company then merged with Nora Industrier in 1992. Borregaard was spun off and introduced to the Oslo Stock Exchange in October 2012, with Orkla retaining a minority stake in the company.[4] Orkla heavily invests in foods and among others acquired Swedish brewery Pripps as well as other companies including Abba Seafood, Baltic Beverages Holding and Procordia Food. Norwegian Ringnes and Pripps were merged with Carlsberg Breweries, where Orkla acquires a 40% ownership in 2000. Orkla sold its ownership in Carlsberg in 2004, the same year it buys SladCo.

 

In 2005 Orkla bought the Norwegian material company Elkem and Sapa Group in Sweden. In 2010 Orkla bought the Estonian confectionary company Kalev. At the beginning of 2013 Orkla owns «Слад&Ко» (SladCo), «Фабрика имени Крупской» (Fabrika imeni Krupskoy), «Конфи» (Konfi), «Волжанка» (Volzhanka), «Пекарь» (Pekar), «Азарт» (Azart) confectionery brands through Orkla brands Russia. It is known to be the fifth largest confectionery producer in Russia.[5]

 

Brands

 

Orkla Foods

Abba Seafood - Seafood

Ahti - Herring

Bähncke - Condiments

Banos - Banana spread

Beauvais - Condiments

Big One - Frozen pizzas

Big One Diner - American food

Bjellands Fiskeboller - Canned fish balls

Bob - Juice, fruit preserves

Boy - Herring

Den Gamle Fabrik - Fruit preserves

Denja - Salads, herrings

Ejderns - Caviar

Ekstrom - Desserts

Felix - Condiments, potatoes, vegetables

Frödinge - Desserts

Fun Light - Squash

Geisha - Rice products

Gimsøy Baker'n - Baking ingredients

Gimsøy Drinkmix - Drink mix

Glyngøre - Herring

Grandiosa - Frozen pizzas

Grebbestads - Anchovies

Gutta - Juice

Gøy - Squash

Hold-It - Calzones

Hållö - Shellfish

Idun - Condiments

Jacky - Yoghurts, puddings

JOKK - Juice

K-salat - Salads

Kalles Kaviar - Caviar

Kikkoman - Soy sauces

Kokkeklar - Soups

Kung Gustaf - Seafood

Lierne - Lefse

Limfjord - Seafood

Liva Energi - Energy drinks, protein drinks

Lucullus - Herring

Løvstek - Cube steak

Mors hjemmebakte flatbrød - Flatbrød

Mr. Lee - Instant noodles

Mrs. Cheng's - Asian food

Nora - Fruit preserves, canned vegetables, desserts, squash

Nugatti -  spreads

Nøtte - Hazelnut butter

Pastella - Pasta

Paulúns - Natural food

Pizza Originale - Frozen pizzas

Risifrutti - Porridges

SaritaS - Indian food

Sjokade -  spreads

Spilva - Condiments, canned vegetables, juices, ready meals

Stabburet Leverpostei - Leverpostej

Stabburet Pai - Frozen pies

Stabburet Picnic - Canned ham

Sunda - Honey

SUSLAVICIUS - Condiments, fruit preserves

Svennes - Caviar

Tomtegløgg - Mulled wine

Toro - Soups, desserts, spices, powdered drink mixes

Trondhjems - Canned food

Truly Thai - Thai food

Vesta - Herring

Vestlandslefsa - Lefse

Vossafår - Cold cuts

Önos - Fruit preserves, squash

Orkla Confectionary & Snacks[]

Ballerina - Cookies

Bamsemums -

Bergene Melk -

Bixit - Cookies

Bocca -

Café bakeriet - Cookies

Caramello -

Crispo -

Cuba -

Doc - Throat lozenges

Extra - Chewing gum (Distribution only)

Gjende - Cookies

Göteborgs Kex - Cookies

Gullbrød - Marzipan

Hjemmelaget Julemarsipan - Marzipan

Hobby -

Hubba Bubba - Chewing gum (Distribution only)

IFA - Throat lozenges

Juicy Fruit - Chewing gum (Distribution only)

Julegris - Marzipan pig

Julemarsipan - Marzipan

Kalev - s, biscuits, cookies

KiMs - Potato chips

Knott -

Kornmo - Biscuits

Krembanan -

Kremtopper -

Krokantrøffel -

Laban -

Laima -

Mokkabønner -

Mokkatrøffel -

Nero -

New Energy -

Nidar - s, bulk

OLW - Potato chips

Panda - Liquorice

Panda Liqueur -

Polly - Nuts

Safari - Cookies

Sfinx -  box

Skipper - Liquorice

Smash! -

Smørbukk - Caramel

Snøstenger - Marzipan

Stratos -

Sætre - Biscuits, cookies

Troika -

Orkla Home & Personal[]

Lilleborg[]

Axe - Male grooming products (Distribution only)

Blenda - Laundry products

Comfort - Fabric softeners

Define - Hair care products

Domestos - Cleaning products

Dove - Personal care products (Distribution only)

Dr. Greve - Hygiene products

Jif - Cleaning products

Jordan - Dental hygiene products, cleaning supplies

Klorin - Chlorine products

Krystal - Cleaning products

Lano - Soap

Lypsyl - Moisturising lip balm (Distribution only)

Milo - Laundry products

Naturelle - Soaps

OMO - Detergents

Pepsodent - Toothpaste (Distribution only)

Persil - Laundry products

Salmi - Cleaning products

Solidox - Toothpaste

Sterilan - Deoderants

Sun - Dishwashing products

Sunsilk - Hair care products

Svint - Steel wool soap

Vaseline Intensive Care - Skin care products (Distribution only)

Zalo - Dishwashing products

Orkla Health[]

Collett - Vitamin supplements

CuraMed - Throat lozenges

Gerimax - Ginseng products

Gevita - Vitamin supplements, mineral supplements, herbal remedies

Litozin - Rosehip powder

Maxim - Sports nutrition

Möller’s Tran - Omega-3 products

Nutrilett - Protein bars, dieting products

Pikasol - Omega-3 supplements

Sana-sol - Vitamin supplements

Triomar - Omega-3 supplements

Vitaminbjørner - Vitamin supplements

Vivag - Intimate care products

Pierre Robert Group[]

La Mote - Clothes

Pierre Robert - Clothes

Orkla Food Ingredients[]

AMA - Margerine

Bakkedal - Butter

BaKo - Baking equipment, cake decorations

Bæchs Conditori - Baked goods

Candeco - Cake decorations, ice cream decorations

Credin - Baking products

Frima Vafler - Ice cream cones

Jästbolaget - Yeast

Kronjäst - Yeast

KåKå - Baking products

Mors Hjemmebakte - Baking products

Naturli' - Organic beverages

Nic - Ice cream accessories

Odense - Marzipan, nougat,

PureOil - Cooking oil

Sonneveld - Professional baking products

Other investments[]

Gränges - Aluminium (Listed on the Stockholm Stock Exchange)

Hydro Power - Power plants Sarpefossen - Power plant

AS Saudefaldene (85%) - Power plant

Jotun (42.53%) - Paint manufacturer

Orkla Eiendom - Real estate related to Orkla's own operations

Sapa Group (50%) - Aluminium

 

References[]

1.^  up to: a b c "Annual Report 2011". Orkla. Retrieved 29 March 2012.

2. up ^ Robert G. Picard, ed. (2002). Media Firms: Structures, Operations, and Performance. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. p. 127. Retrieved 6 January 2015. – via Questia (subscription required)

3. up ^ Eva Harrie (2009). "The Nordic Media Market" (PDF). Göteborg: Nordicom, University of Gothenburg. Retrieved 10 December 2014.

4. up ^ About us: History borregaard.no. Retrieved 11 November 2012.

5. up ^ Orkla Brands

External links[]

Official website

Orkla Annual Report 2011

OBX companies of Norway

 Aker Solutions ·

 Cermaq ·

 DNB ·

 DNO International ·

 Fred. Olsen Energy ·

 Frontline ·

 Gjensidige ·

 Golar LNG ·

 Marine Harvest ·

 Norsk Hydro ·

 Orkla ·

 Petroleum Geo-Services ·

 Prosafe ·

 Renewable Energy Corporation ·

 Royal Caribbean Cruises ·

 Schibsted ·

 Seadrill ·

 Statoil ·

 Storebrand ·

 Subsea 7 ·

 Telenor ·

 TGS-NOPEC ·

 Yara

 

See also: Companies listed on the Oslo Stock Exchange

Categories: 1654 establishments

Food companies of Norway

Mining companies of Norway

Orkla Group

Companies based in Oslo

Companies established in the 1650s

Holding companies of Norway

Companies listed on the Oslo Stock Exchange

1654 establishments in Norway

Laima is the largest producer of confectionery in Latvia. Its headquarters are in Riga. It is named for Laima, the feminine deity of fate in Latvian mythology.

 

Contents  [hide]

1 Company history

2 Brand recognition

3 References

4 External links

 

Company history[]

The company traces its origins to the 19th century, when the Theodor Riegert company was one of the largest confectioners in the Baltic Provinces of the Russian Empire. Despite the loss of Russian markets, the company maintained its major market position domestically following Latvia's independence in 1918. The current company name was adopted in 1925 after a merger with Eliyahu Fromenchenko (also spelled Fromchenko), a Russian Jew, who later sold the company and founded Elite in Israel at Ramat Gan.[2]

 

During the both the 1930s and Soviet period in Latvia, Laima was the main chocolatier in Latvia, with L.W. Goegginger (later renamed Uzvara by the Soviets) being the main producer of hard candies.

 

After Latvia regained its independence in the 1990s, Laima amalgamated with both Uzvara and cookie, wafer, and cake manufacturer Staburadze to become a single company under the Laima name.

 

Unlike similar regional producers of cherished national brands, such as Lithuania's Karūna, Sweden's Marabou, and Norway's Freia, Laima managed to avoid being bought out by an international player like Kraft Foods.

 

Ownership of Laima is controlled by Nordic Food, owned by local businessman Daumants Vītols.[3] After introducing Laima shares to the Riga Stock Exchange in December 2006, the controlling owners decided to once again make the company private, taking it off the market on 13 July 2007.[4]

The parent company of Laima was acquired by Orkla Group in August 2014.[5]

Brand recognition[]

The Laima Clock with the Freedom Monument visible in the background

The product in Laima's current range with the longest history is the   Serenāde, the recipe for which has remained unchanged since 1937.

 

In Riga, one of the major landmarks is the Laima Clock, near the Freedom Monument. This is a classic meeting place for people in Riga.

 

As a publicity gesture, in 2007 Laima gave the inhabitants of Ruhnu island in the Gulf of Riga a 40 kg statue of a bear made of , to commemorate a brown bear that had swum over, presumably from the Latvian mainland, to the Estonian island.[6]

 

References[]

 

1.^  up to: a b "Pērn būtiski samazinājies "Laimas" un "Staburadzes" apgrozījums, bet pieaugusi peļņa". Kapitāls. 2012-11-23.

2. up ^ The murder of the Jews in Latvia: 1941-1945 By Bernhard Press

3. up ^ "Par 'Nordic Food' vienīgo īpašnieku kļuvis Daumants Vītols". Delfi. 2012-11-23.

4. up ^ "Laima verschwindet von der Börse" (in German). nov.ost.info. 2007-07-12. Retrieved 2008-02-02.

5. up ^ "Orkla expands its Baltic operation by acquiring strong local brands". Orkla Group. 2014-09-15.

6. up ^ Sheeter, Laura (2007-04-06). "Latvia bears giant  gift". BBC News. Retrieved 2008-02-02.

External links[]

Official website (in Latvian, Russian and English)

Images of Laima wrapper designs throughout the decades

Categories: Brand name confectionery

Companies based in Riga

Soviet brands

Latvian brands

Food companies of the Soviet Union

Companies established in 1870

companies

 

Extra is a brand of sugarfree chewing gum produced by the Wrigley Company in North America, Europe, and some parts of Africa and Australasia.[1]

Contents  [hide]

1 Brand history

2 Flavours 2.1 Availability of flavours

3 References

4 External links

 

Brand history[]

Extra was launched in 1984 as the Wrigley Company's first ever sugarfree product, and became one of the most popular brands of chewing gum in the United States within a few years.[2] It was also the first sugarfree gum not to use saccharin, instead using the NutraSweet brand, a sweetener developed by G.D. Searle & Co. that had less bitterness and was believed to be safer in humans and laboratory animals; it was later reformulated with aspartame in 1997.

 

The brand identity of Extra gum varies considerably in different markets, often having completely different flavours, logos and slogans for each country. Extra is currently the sponsor of Mexico national team.[3]

 

In 2007, Extra became the first chewing gum to receive the American Dental Association's Seal of Acceptance.[citation needed]

 

In 2011, Extra Oral Healthcare Program partnered with the Chinese Ministry of Health to launch a three-year community oral care education pilot program, which establishes community dental clinics, trains local dentists and establishes oral care records for 7,000 families across 14 communities. The results of the program will inform the Ministry of Health’s future oral care policy.[citation needed] In the second project year, the team decided to build an application for oral health teaching among families, especially for some undeveloped cities.

 

In the UK gum that had been sold as Orbit was renamed Extra in 2015, with the same 14-piece package.[4]

 

Flavours[]

 

Availability of flavours[]

Flavour

U.S.[2]

U.K.[5]

Australasia[6]

Active Yes No Yes

Spearmint Yes Yes Yes

Peppermint Yes Yes Yes

Cool Breeze Yes Yes Yes

Winterfresh Yes No No

Ice Yes Yes No

Polar Ice Yes No No

Classic Bubble Yes Yes Yes

Smooth Mint Yes Yes Yes

Strawberry Yes Yes Yes

Watermelon Yes Yes Yes

Tropical/Mango Yes Yes Yes

Berry Yes Yes Yes

White Yes Yes Yes

 

References[]

 

1. up ^ "Worldwide Brands". Wrigley.com. Retrieved 2013-03-04.

2.^  up to: a b "Extra | Sugar Free Gum | Extra Dessert Delights". Wrigley.com. Retrieved 2013-03-04.

3. up ^ "Extra® Gum, the Official Sponsor of the Mexican National Team, Brings CONCACAF Gold... – CHICAGO, June 24, 2011 /PRNewswire/". Prnewswire.com. Retrieved 2013-03-04.

4. up ^ betterretailing.com: Orbit gum will be rebranded as Extra from January

5. up ^ "Wrigley UK :: Extra". Wrigley.com. Retrieved 2013-03-04.

6. up ^ "EXTRA®". Wrigley.com.au. Retrieved 2013-03-04.

 

External links[]

Wrigley's Extra Gum home page

Brands

Products for human consumption

3 Musketeers ·

A. Korkunov ·

 Balisto ·

 Bounty ·

 Celebrations ·

 Dove ·

 Ethel M ·

 Fling ·

 Flyte ·

 Kudos ·

 M-Azing ·

 M&M's ·

 Maltesers ·

 Mars ·

 Milky Way ·

 Revels ·

 Snickers ·

 Topic ·

 Tracker ·

 Treets ·

 Twix

 Galaxy

 Galaxy Milk  ·

 Galaxy Caramel ·

 Galaxy Crispy ·

 Galaxy Hazelnut ·

 Galaxy Fruit & Nut ·

 Galaxy Minstrels ·

 Galaxy Ripple ·

 Galaxy Senzi ·

 Galaxy Amicelli ·

 Galaxy Bubbles ·

 Galaxy Jewels ·

 Galaxy Promises ·

 Galaxy Honeycomb Crisp ·

 Galaxy Cookie Crumble ·

 Galaxy Orange & Shortcake

 

Food

Combos ·

 Dolmio ·

 Masterfoods ·

 Munch ·

 Promite ·

 Seeds of Change ·

 Uncle Ben's Rice

 

Drink

CocoaVia ·

FLAVIA ·

Klix

 

Wrigley gum and

confections

 

Chewing gum

 With sugar

 Alert ·

 Big Red ·

 Doublemint ·

 Juicy Fruit ·

 Wrigley's Spearmint ·

 Winterfresh

 

Sugarfree

 

5 ·

 Airwaves ·

 Eclipse Ice ·

 Excel ·

 Extra ·

 Freedent ·

 Orbit ·

 Surpass

Bubblegum

With sugar

Alpine ·

Big League Chew ·

Bubble Tape ·

Hubba Bubba

Sugarfree

Ouch!

Mint and

Altoids ·

 Eclipse ·

 Life Savers ·

 Lockets ·

 Skittles ·

 Starburst ·

 Tunes

 Products for non-human consumption

Pet care

ADVANCE ·

 Aquarium Pharmaceuticals ·

 Buckeye Nutrition ·

 Cesar ·

 Chappi ·

 Eukanuba ·

 Exelpet ·

 Greenies ·

 Iams ·

 Medi-Cal ·

 My Dog ·

 Natura ·

 Nutro ·

 Pedigree ·

 Pill Pockets ·

 Royal Canin ·

 Schmackos ·

 Seramis ·

 Sheba ·

 Spillers ·

 Teasers ·

 Techni-Cal ·

 Whiskas ·

 Winergy ·

 Wisdom Panel MX Mixed Breed DNA Test

 

Services

Pet care

Banfield Pet Hospital

Categories: Wrigley Company

Wrigley Company brands

1984 introductions

Chewing gum

Brand name confectionery

American confectionery

 

Hubba Bubba

For the Singaporean band, see HubbaBubbas.

2015 Australian and New Zealand packets containing five pieces of gum

Hubba Bubba is a brand of bubble gum originally produced by Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company, a subsidiary of Mars, Incorporated,[1] in the United States in 1979 but more recently produced in countries around the world. The bubble gum got its name from the phrase "Hubba Hubba" that military personnel in World War II used to express approval.[2] The main gimmick used to promote the gum is that Hubba Bubba is less sticky than other brands of bubble gum and so burst bubbles are easier to peel from your skin. The first portions of Hubba Bubba were produced in the traditional bubble gum flavor often referred to as Original, but different flavors of gum have been produced around the world. Many, but not all, of these flavors are based on fruit. Hubba Bubba products also include many flavors of soda, bubble gum and squeeze pouches.[1]

 

Product description[]

 

Before its launch, Hubba Bubba had been referred to as "Stagecoach" during product development and early manufacturing at the now-defunct Wrigley plant in Santa Cruz, California. The earliest series of TV commercials for Hubba Bubba that aired in the United States were set in a Wild West town and featured a character known as the Gumfighter, played by actor Don Collier. At the end of each commercial, the Gum Fighter declared, "Big bubbles, no troubles," followed by a jocular response from Western film veteran Dub Taylor.[3] This was a reference to Hubba Bubba being less sticky than other brands. Hubba Bubbas' main competition for most of the 1980s was the brand Bubblicious.

 

The original bubble-gum flavor was discontinued for many years in the United Kingdom, with only apple, strawberry, and cola flavors available. As of June 2012, flavours available in the UK include strawberry, original and apple (In April 2012 The original flavour returned, with packs proclaiming "chunkier and bubblier)".[4] Flavors available in Australia include cherry, cola, peach, strawberry, lime, pineapple, apple, orange, grape and watermelon. As of 2004, flavors available in Croatia included lime, berry, cherry and generic fruit. Flavors available in Germany included cherry and cola. Flavors available in Norway include orange, apple, strawberry, cola and licorice. Flavors available in Canada included strawberry, grape, orange and blue raspberry. Other flavors seen over the years in various countries include lemon, cream soda, tropical, salty liquorice, and  strawberry.

 

At first, Hubba Bubba was only available in chunks, typically being sold in packets of five chunks. More recently, it has been produced as shredded pieces (see Big League Chew), rolls of bubble gum tape in the UK (tapes of 1.8 meter strips of mixed flavors), plastic jugs of crystals, boxes of tiny gumballs and stuffed with .

 

The Hubba Bubba brand was discontinued in the U.S. in the early 1990s, but returned in 2004.[1] In the U.S., in 2006, commercials use the same stop-motion style used in the Chevron commercials and Chicken Run, as the commercials are produced by Aardman. In Canada, commercials use cartoon characters named Hubba and Bubba. It was also used in the closing crs sequence on the popular YTV game show Uh Oh!.

 

As of 2012, Hubba Bubba is available in its original flavor called "Outrageous Original" in the U.S. Other flavors are "Strawberry Watermelon," "Cool Cola," "Sweet & Sassy Cherry," and "Mystery Flavor.".[1] Hubba Bubba introduced Mystery Max and Mystery Tape in 2010.[1]

 

References[]

 

1.^  up to: a b c d e "Hubba Bubba". Wrigley.com. Retrieved June 8, 2012.

2. up ^ http://www.oldtime.com/hubba-bubba-gum.htm

3. up ^ Hubba Bubba High noon. YouTube. 26 July 2006.

4. up ^ "Wrigley UK :: Hubba Bubba". Wrigley.com. Retrieved 2011-01-08.

 

Brands

Products for human consumption

3 Musketeers ·

 A. Korkunov ·

 Balisto ·

 Bounty ·

 Celebrations ·

 Dove ·

 Ethel M ·

 Fling ·

 Flyte ·

 Kudos ·

 M-Azing ·

 M&M's ·

 Maltesers ·

 Mars ·

 Milky Way ·

 Revels ·

 Snickers ·

 Topic ·

 Tracker ·

 Treets ·

 Twix

 

Galaxy

Galaxy Milk  ·

Galaxy Caramel ·

 Galaxy Crispy ·

 Galaxy Hazelnut ·

 Galaxy Fruit & Nut ·

 Galaxy Minstrels ·

 Galaxy Ripple ·

 Galaxy Senzi ·

 Galaxy Amicelli ·

 Galaxy Bubbles ·

 Galaxy Jewels ·

 Galaxy Promises ·

 Galaxy Honeycomb Crisp ·

 Galaxy Cookie Crumble ·

 Galaxy Orange & Shortcake

 

Food

 

Combos ·

 Dolmio ·

 Masterfoods ·

 Munch ·

 Promite ·

 Seeds of Change ·

 Uncle Ben's Rice

 Drink

CocoaVia ·

 FLAVIA ·

 Klix

 

 

Wrigley gum and

Confections

Chewing gum

With sugar

Alert ·

 Big Red ·

 Doublemint ·

 Juicy Fruit ·

 Wrigley's Spearmint ·

 Winterfresh

  Sugarfree

 

5 ·

 Airwaves ·

 Eclipse Ice ·

 Excel ·

 Extra ·

 Freedent ·

 Orbit ·

 Surpass

 Bubblegum

 With sugar

 Alpine ·

 Big League Chew ·

 Bubble Tape ·

 Hubba Bubba

 

Sugarfree

Ouch!

Mint and

Altoids ·

 Eclipse ·

 Life Savers ·

 Lockets ·

 Skittles ·

 Starburst ·

 Tunes

 Products for non-human consumption

 ADVANCE ·

 Aquarium Pharmaceuticals ·

 Buckeye Nutrition ·

 Cesar ·

 Chappi ·

 Eukanuba ·

 Exelpet ·

 Greenies ·

 Iams ·

 Medi-Cal ·

 My Dog ·

 Natura ·

 Nutro ·

 Pedigree ·

 Pill Pockets ·

 Royal Canin ·

 Schmackos ·

 Seramis ·

 Sheba ·

 Spillers ·

 Teasers ·

 Techni-Cal ·

 Whiskas ·

 Winergy ·

 Wisdom Panel MX Mixed Breed DNA Test

 Services

Categories: 1979 introductions

Chewing gum

Wrigley Company brands

 

Juicy Fruit is a flavor of chewing gum made by the Wrigley Company, a U.S. company that since 2008 has been a subsidiary of the privately held Mars, Incorporated. It was introduced in 1893, and in the 21st century the brand name is recognized by 99 percent of Americans, with total sales in 2002 of 153 million units.[1]

 

Contents  [hide]

1 Description 1.1 Flavoring

1.2 Consumer demographics

1.3 New flavors

1.4 Ingredients

2 History

3 References

4 External links

 

 

Description[]

Metal advertising sign.

Flavoring[]

 

Which fruit serves as the model for its flavor is kept vague in advertising, though in 2003, advertising agency BBDO characterized it as a combination of banana and pineapple,[1] and some people[2] say it resembles jackfruit. According to two books in the Imponderables series, peach is one crucial flavor among many others.[3][4]

 

It is likely that the chemical used for flavoring is isoamyl acetate (sometimes known as banana oil), a carboxylic ester.[5]

Each stick of gum weighs 3 grams (0.11 oz) and contains 10 Calories.[6]

Consumer demographics[]

The average age of the typical Juicy Fruit consumer is under 20, with 3- to 11-year-olds making up the heart of the business; those 20 years old and over account for 40 percent of the purchases.[1]

Sean Payton, head coach of the New Orleans Saints of the NFL is well known for requesting a Juicy Fruit in the middle of games.

 

New flavors[]

Juicy Fruit have just released a "Sweet Flavors" Kiwi-Strawberry flavor. They have also released Juicy Fruit Desserts. There are 4 variations of Desserts: Orange Creme Pop, Strawberry Shortcake, Lemon Square and Apple Pie. Juicy Fruit also has released Juicy Secret and Juicy Riddle which are both sugar free. Beginning in 2015, Juicy Fruit released two new flavors based on Starburst : Strawberry and Cherry.[7]

 

Ingredients[]

 

Juicy Fruit gum consists mostly of sugar contained in a synthetic gum base. Other ingredients include corn syrup and dextrose as bulk agents and natural sweeteners, natural and artificial flavorings, glycerol and lecithin as softening agents, aspartame (NutraSweet) and acesulfame K as artificial sweeteners, Yellow Lake 5 as a coloring and BHT as a preservative.

 

History[]

A Juicy Fruit wrapper from 1946, described on the package as a "fascinating artificial flavor".

When the brand first entered the market, it was packaged simply, with a plain wrapper and "JUICY FRUIT" in red, thin block letters. In 1914, Wrigley changed it to thin vertical white and green stripes with "Wrigley's Juicy Fruit Chewing Gum" centered in a stylized Maltese Cross emblem with a black background.[8]

 

Juicy Fruit was taken off of the civilian market temporarily during World War II because of ingredient shortages and the demand for the gum to be included in C-rations. When the gum was re-introduced to the general public after World War II ended, the striped packaging was replaced by one with a bright yellow background and "Juicy Fruit" bracketed between two stylized chevrons, the latter a motif meant to echo the "Wrigley arrow" element used for Wrigley's Spearmint since 1893.[8] The bright yellow background remained into the 21st century, with variations since 2002 turning the arrowhead-like chevrons into the corners of an elongated smile under the brand name.[8] Juicy Fruit is still widely popular today.[citation needed]

 

In 2003 in the United States, Wrigley's replaced some of the sugar in Juicy Fruit with two artificial sweeteners, aspartame and Ace K. In 2009, Wrigley's started selling a sugar-free version of Juicy Fruit.[citation needed]

 

"Grapefruit—Juicy Fruit" is a song written and performed by American popular music singer-songwriter Jimmy Buffett. It was first released on his 1973 album A White Sport Coat and a Pink Crustacean and was his third single from that album. The single reached #23 on the Billboard Easy Listening chart in September 1973.

 

Juicy Fruit is mentioned in the Regina Spektor song Wallet, from her album Far. It is also mentioned in the movie, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Chief Bromden: "Mmm, Juicy Fruit". It is also mentioned in the song "Juicy Fruit" by Mtume from 1983.[9]

 

References[]

 

1.^  up to: a b c "Marketing symposium at Johnson School asks what makes brands legendary". Cornell Chronicle. Cornell University. November 6, 2003. Retrieved 2009-08-07.

2. up ^ Karen Chu (July 23, 2012). "GoodJobBrain.com". http://www.goodjobbrain.com (Podcast). Event occurs at 12:45PM. Retrieved May 24, 2014.

3. up ^ Feldman, David (2004) [First published in 1986 as Imponderables: The Solution to the Mysteries of Everyday Life]. Why Don't Cats Like to Swim?. Imponderables. p. 71. Retrieved 2009-08-07.

4. up ^ Feldman, David (2005) [First published in 1989]. When Do Fish Sleep?. Imponderables. p. 242. Retrieved 2009-08-07.

5. up ^ Pavia, Donald L.; Lampman, Kriz, Engel (2007). Introduction to Organic Laboratory Techniques. Thomson Brooks/Cole. ISBN 978-0-495-01630-4.

6. up ^ Nutrition Info

7. up ^ "Direct Access: Arianna Huffington". The Huffington Post. January 28, 2015. Retrieved February 3, 2015.

8.^  up to: a b c Juicy Fruit Packaging, from Wrigley's website

9. up ^ Juicy Fruit (song)

 

External links[]

Juicy Fruit, the official website for the brand.

"Juicy Fruit" at the Wrigley's website

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KiMs is a brand of chips and snacks, owned by the Orkla Group.

 

The brand "KiM" was trademarked in 1961 by Odense Marcipanfabrik (a marzipan factory) in Denmark, but as a German cigarette brand of this name already existed, the name was changed to "KiMs" in 1965. In 1990 the owning company was sold to Nora Industrier, and the KiMs division was made into a stock company. The year after, KiMs became part of the Norwegian Orkla Group when Nora and Orkla merged. In 2013 KiMs No became a part of Orkla Confectionery & Snacks NO, and KiMs DK became a part of Orkla Confectionery & Snacks DK.

 

Products include ordinary chips with either salt, salt and pepper or paprika seasonings, KiMs Minimal with less fat and either sea salt or paprika seasoning, KiMs Delivio made with olive oil and salt, sea salt and pepper or red and green paprika seasonings, KiMs Chips O'Hoi with sea salt and KiMs Mexican Fiesta. KiMs also manufactures two types of tortilla chips branded as KiMs Mexos with either salt or cheese seasoning as well as a number of other snacks including popcorn, bacon chips, french fries and potato sticks. Dip is available in mexos, guacamole, holiday, tortilla, tzatziki and garlic flavours

 

Nidar is a Norwegian producer and distributor of confectionery. Nidar's factory is located in Trondheim, Norway. It is part of the Orkla Group.[1]

 

The company is one of the leading distributor of sweets to the Norwegian marketplace, selling sweets for over NOK 1 billion in 2003, with approx. 600 employees. In January, 2005, the company had a market share of 31.4%.

 

Nidar produces sugar products, confectionery, marzipan and pastilles, in addition to having responsibility of distribution and sales of Wrigley chewing gum and sweets in the Norwegian marketplace. Among their most known and popular brands include: Stratos, Laban, Troika, Crispo, NERO, Smash!, Doc' Halslinser (with or without liquid core), New Energy, Bocca, Bamsemums, Smørbukk, Mokka Trøffel, Mokka Bønner, Nidar Julemarsipan, Extra, Krembanan and Kremtopper.[2]

 

Nidar was established in 1912 and still based out of Trondheim, Norway. The company went through several acquisitions and mergers in the 1970s, and as such carries on the products and traditions of three other Norwegian companies:

Kiellands Fabrikker A/S, Oslo, est. 1891

Lorentz Erbe & Søn A/S, Trondheim, est. 1899

Bergene A/S, Oslo, est. 1906

Polly is a series of peanut-based snacks made by KiMs Norge, a subsidiary of the Orkla Group, sold throughout Norway. In addition to the traditional peanut products, other producs include cashewnuts, chilinuts in addition to a number of mixed producs including various nuts and raisins.

Originally Polly AS was a Skien-based company that eventually was bought by Sætre. In 1991 the Sætre corporation was bought by Orkla and two years later the production was moved to the KiMs plant at Skreia.

Smash! is a Norwegian snack produced by Nidar. It consists of salted corn cores covered by milk producing a salt & sweet, light & crisp combination. It is available in one flavour, in four sizes: a small bag of 100 grams, a large bag of 230 grams, a bar of 40 grams, a bar of 160 grams, and in 2012, an extra large bag of 345 grams. Smash! was developed at Nidar's lab in Trondheim in the 1980s by the Norwegian millionaire "Snow".

 

Sætre is a Norwegian biscuit company.

 

It was established in 1883 by Hans Otto Røhr at Sætre farm in Heggedal. The production moved to Kristiania in 1907 and Kolbotn in 1967. In 2000 the production at Kolbotn was discontinued, moving to Kungälv. The company was owned by Borregaard from 1984 to 1986 and the Orkla Group since 1986.[1]

 

Its brands include Marie, Gjende, Ballerina, Safari, Kornmo and Bixit.[1]

 

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