The History of Ferrara  Company

 

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Ferrara  Company

Ferrara  Logo.png

Type

Private

Industry

Confectionery

Founded

1908 in Chicago, Illinois, US

Founder

Salvatore Ferrara, Salvatore Buffardi and Anello Pagano

Headquarters

One Tower Ln, ste 2700

Oakbrook Terrace, Illinois, US

Area served

Worldwide

Brands

Brach's • Lemonhead ()  • Chuckles  • Now and Later  • Bobs Candies • Trolli USA  • Black Forest  • Sathers • Red Hots • Atomic Fireball • Ser Bubble • Rainblo • Jujyfruit • Jawbuster • Fruit Stripe • Boston Baked Beans •

 

Owner

Ferrara family and Catterton Partners

Website

www.ferrarausa.com

 

The Ferrara  Company (formerly known as the Farley's & Sathers  Company) is a  company that makes a variety of candies. Their confections include Lemonheads, Brach's, Jaw Busters ("The Original Jaw Breakers"), Atomic Fireballs, Chuckles, Original Boston Baked Beans, Chewy Lemon Heads & Friends, Tropical Chewy Lemon Heads & Friends and Red Hots.

 

Contents  [hide]

1 History

2 Timeline

3 Products

4 References

5 External links

 

History

 

Salvatore Ferrara came from Nola, Italy to New York in 1899 at the age of 15. The Ferrara family had been bakers in Italy. In 1908 he opened a bakery at 772 W. Taylor, in the heart of Chicago's "Little Italy" neighborhood. He sold -coated almonds known as "confetti" (also known as Jordan almonds), a popular treat at Italian weddings.

 

When  sales became greater than pastries, Ferrara partnered with two brothers-in-law, Salvatore Buffardi and Anello Pagano. They built a two-story brick building at 2200 W. Taylor and began producing a variety of panned candies. The second floor of the building was devoted to the revolving kettles that produced the pan , with all of the machines being driven by a giant wheel. The  was dropped to the shipping department below through a hole in the floor.

Lemonhead candies were introduced in 1962. Ferrara now makes 500 million Lemonheads per year.[1]

In 2012, Ferrara Pan merged with Farley & Sather's Candies to form Ferrara  Company.

Ferrara  is now headquartered in Oakbrook Terrace, Illinois. Ferrara  currently operates 11 manufacturing plants in the US and Mexico, as well as distribution centers around the US.

Brach's  Corn

 

The company sells 92% of all mallowcremes in the US; it is the largest producer of  canes; the largest seller of conversation hearts; produces a large portion of the jelly beans that are consumed in the United States. The company has 21 starch moguls, of 40 in the US as a whole. The company has between 700 and 800 pans operating at any given time...it is believed that no other US company has more than 150. It is claimed that the company produces a million pounds of gummy  per week in 4 manufacturing plants, 2 in the US and 2 in Mexico.[85] The company employs approximately 1,000 people.

 

Timeline

1860s Henry Heide Company begins business

1890s Farley Company established

1904 Brach's Candies begins production in the backroom of a Chicago store. Brock's of Chattanooga begins production of penny candies, peanut brittle and jelly candies.

1908 Ferrara Pan  is formed

1919 Bobs Candies is formed

1930s Sathers  Company begins operations

1980s Trolli Gummis begins production in the U.S.

1994 Brach's  purchases a controlling interest in Brock's  of Chattanooga

1995 Favorite Brands International created with purchase of Kraft Caramel, Marshmallow, Dinner Mints and Peanut Brittle businesses. Henry Heide, Inc is sold to Hershey Foods.

1996 Favorite Brands International acquires Farley Foods, Sathers  and Kidd Marshmallow businesses

1997 Favorite Brands International acquires Dae Julie and the Trolli Gummi businesses

2002 Catterton Partners form Farleys & Sathers  Company made  of assets from the former Farley Foods, Sathers  Company, and the Kraft Taffy business from Kraft; Chuckles and several other Henry Heide brands purchased from Hershey Foods.

2005 Farley & Sathers acquires the Trolli Gummi business, which had been part of the Favorite Brands gro of products, from Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company, which had acquired it as part of a larger gro of businesses from Kraft. Bob's Candies is acquired.

2007 Farley & Sathers acquires Brach's

2012 Ferrara Pan  Company and Farley & Sathers merge and rename the new entity Ferrara

 

Products

 

Brach's • A  and sweets brand which produces and has invented many modern icons of the sugary world including  Corn, Conversation Hearts, Jelly Bird Eggs, Star Brite Mints, Royals, Bridge Mix, Malted Milk Balls, Double Dipped Peanuts and many, many more.

 

Lemonhead () • Introduced in 1962, produced by the Ferrara  Company. Lemonheads are a round, lemon-flavored  consisting of a sweet coating, soft sour shell, and a hard  core. Other varieties include Appleheads, Grapeheads and Chewy Lemonheads & Friends varieties.

 

Lemonheads

Chuckles • A soft jelly , covered in sugar and known for its original 5 colors (Red, Orange, Yellow,Green and Black). They are now made in a number of varieties including Mini’s, Red’s and seasonal varieties.

Now and Later • Bite sized sharable squares of taffy in nineteen different fruit flavors. They come in Original, Chewy and Splits varieties and are packaged in both multi pieced bars and assorted jars.

Bobs Candies • Soft Mints and Sticks,  Canes and Mint "Lumps"

Trolli (USA) • Weirdly awesome flavors, weirdly awesome shapes, weirdly awesome fun. Gummy candies that are both sour and sweet as well as delicious and demented.

Black Forest  • Real fruit juice snacks and treats in fun shapes; Gummy Bears, Gummy Worms and other varieties.

Red Hots  • a small cinnamon-flavored  created and trademarked by the Ferrara Pan  Company in the 1930s

Atomic Fireball • a round, cinnamon-flavored hard  invented by Nello Ferrara (1918–2012) in 1954. They are a form of jawbreaker. The outer layers of the  are a bright red color while the interior layers are white.

 

Rainblo • The first gumballs made where the color on the outside matched the flavor on the inside. Available in regular Rain-blo and Jum-blo size.

Jumblo Gum

Jujyfruit • Small, chewy, fruit flavored candies that come in fun fruit shapes & flavors like pineapple, raspberry, grape, banana and other citrus shapes. Also available are Jujubes which are a firmer  dating back to 1920 in the traditional flavors of lemon, lime, violet, cherry and lilac.

 

Jawbuster • The original jawbreaker since 1919. They are created starting with a single grain of sugar and panned until they reach the full size. As they dissolve, they change color and flavor with each of the five layers.

 

Fruit Stripe Gum

Fruit Stripe • A chewing gum created in the 60’s loved for its juicy fruit flavor and scent. The package is known for the bright stripes and images of Yipes, the Zebra who has been the mascot of the gum for many decades.

 

Boston Baked Beans • a sugar-coated peanut .

Ser Bubble • The original individually-wrapped bubble gum first introduced to the world in 1946 and still popular in classic original, grape, apple and watermelon flavors.

Sathers • (Farley & Sathers) Since 1936, A leader in the  world offering all types of snacks including Gummies, jellies, chewy and hard candies. Packaged affordably and sold primarily at convenience stores.

 

References

 

1.  ^ Farley’s & Sathers to merge with Ferrara Pan

External links

Official Ferrara  Website

Confectionery products of Ferrara  Company

 Atomic Fireball ·

Bobs Candies ·

Brach's ·

 Chuckles ·

 Sathers ·

 Fruit Stripe ·

 Jujyfruits ·

 Jujubes ·

 Jaw Busters ·

 Lemonhead ·

 Now and Later ·

 Original Boston Baked Beans ·

 Rain-Blo ·

 Red Hots ·

 Ser Bubble ·

 Trolli USA

 

Categories: Forest Park, Illinois

Confectionery companies of the United States

Companies established in 1908

1908 establishments in Illinois

 

Brach's Confections /ˈbrɑːks/ is a  and sweets company which produces and invented many modern icons of the sugary world; it is headquartered in Oakbrook Terrace, Illinois. In November 2007, Brach's Confections was sold to Farley's & Sathers  Company[1] and then 2012, it merged with the Ferrara Pan  Company to form the Ferrara  Company. It is known as "America's  Maker" to pay tribute to their long tradition of making and selling candies in the US since 1904.

 

Contents  [hide]

1 History

2 Products 2.1  Corn

2.2 Conversation Hearts

2.3 Nougats

2.4 Jelly Bird Eggs

2.5 Chocolates

2.6 Other Sweet Treats

3 See also

4 References

5 External links

History

 

Founded in 1904 by Emil Brach, he invested his life savings, $1,000, in a storefront  store. He named it "Brach's Palace of Sweets" and it was located at the corner of North Avenue and Towne Street in Chicago, Illinois. With his sons Edwin and Frank, he started with one kettle. Investing in additional equipment he was able to lower his production costs and sell his  for 20 cents per pound, well below the more typical 50 cents per pound his competitors were charging. By 1911 his production had reached 50,000 pounds per week.[2]

 

By 1923, Brach had 4 factories operating at capacity. Brach then invested $5 million in a new factory, beginning construction in 1921. It was built at 4656 West Kinzie Street, and consolidated production into one building. At the time, they were producing 127 different varieties of  and had a capacity of 2,225,000 pounds per week. Over the years, this new plant was expanded and investments in new processes and equipment were made, including its own chocolate grinding plant and a large panning operation. In 1948, after an electrical spark ignited corn starch, a massive explosion on the plant's third floor killed 11 employees and injured 18. Much of the factory's north side was destroyed. Reconstruction brought the plant's capacity  to more than 4 million pounds of product per year, and it employed 2,400 workers,[2] in 2,200,000 square feet (200,000 m2). It was recognized as the largest  manufacturing plant in the world at the time.[3] At its peak, 4,500 employees worked there. The plant was eventually abandoned in 2003 when new owners took over operations (see below) and production was moved primarily to Mexico. An administrative building was blown  for a special effects scene in The Dark Knight Batman movie in August, 2007,[4] the rest of the complex is in ruins awaiting its eventual demolition.

 

Prior to World War II, Brach's produced several  bars, including a chocolate-covered, honeycombed, peanut butter Swing Bar as well as a mint and almond nougat bar. After the war Brach's concentrated on bulk and bagged candies. It was in the period after the war that Halloween Trick or Treating became a popular activity. Brach's promoted its  corn and other fall-themed candies, available in single-serve, pre-packaged packets.[2]

 

In 1958 Brach's introduced the Pick-A-Mix concept. Customers could choose from a wide selection of products, scooping items of their choosing, and paying one price per pound. This was adapted from the barrels seen in general stores at the time.[2] This concept brought the dying experience of buying  at the local corner store into the new merchandiers, the sermarkets.

 

In 1966, American Home Products Corporation purchased the company. In 1986, the last year of ownership by American Home Products, it accounted for two-thirds of the U.S. market for bagged  and 7% of the $9 billion U.S.  market. It employed 3,700 and had an estimated pretax profit of more than $75 million[5][6] on sales of $640 million.

 

In 1987 Jacobs Suchard Limited, a Swiss chocolate and coffee conglomerate, purchased the company for $730 million and by the end of 1989, it was in serious trouble. Losses that year were an estimated $50 million and sales had decreased to $470 million. By 1993, sales had dropped to $400 million though losses were reduced somewhat to $26 million. All this occurred during a period when overall per capita  consumption in the U.S. had increased 25%. By May, 1994, after 7 years of Suchard ownership, Brach's had had 9 different CEOs, moved its headquarters from the plant property to a penthouse office in one of Chicago's wealthiest suburbs, saw a loss of nearly 900 jobs (42% of the workforce at that time), and suffered a loss of key customers and market share.[3][7]

 

Klaus Jacobs almost immediately fired Brach's top officers and gutted the leadership of its sales, marketing, production and finance departments. Some of these positions were filled with executives from Suchard's European operations; people with little experience in the  industry (see: Favorite Brands above). Former executives cited Jacobs Suchard's autocratic management style and inability to recognize the difference between American and European  consumption habits. The name of the company was changed to Jacobs Suchard Inc., a name few retailers or consumers recognized and product lines were trimmed from 1,700 to 400 in an attempt to cut costs.[3] This alienated many of its largest customers, including Walgreens and Walmart, who found other sources, including Farley . In addition to the cuts in product selection, Brach's also chose to curtail holiday promotional activities.[6][8]

 

In 1990, Phillip Morris purchased Jacobs Suchard for $3.8 billion, except for its U.S. subsidiary, E. J. Brach Corp. A holding company named Van Houten & Zoon Holding AG was formed by Klaus Jacobs to run Brach and other businesses. Disagreements with Klaus Jacobs on marketing and management strategies continued, particularly over commodity vs. branded (Brach's) products. In 1993 alone, Brach's saw 3 different CEO's, and continued to experience a high rate of turnover and dismissals within the sales and marketing departments. Many of Brach's sales personnel left to work for its competitors.;[9]

 

In September 1994, E.J. Brach's purchased the Brock  Company of Chattanooga for $140 million, a year in which Brock  had sales of $112 million and profits of $6.5 million. This was the second attempt by the two companies to join together. The first time had been while E.J. Brach's was under American Home Products ownership. The merger attempt at that time was canceled due to concerns of an antitrust suit.

 

For a time the new company operated as the Brach and Brock  Company. This was later changed to Brach's Confections.

 

In 2003, Barry Callebaut AG purchased the new company. The principal owner of Brach's, KJ Jacobs AG, was also a majority stakeholder in Barry Callebaut. As part of the deal, Barry Callebaut agreed to assume $16 million in debt, fund restructuring efforts for 5 years and paid a symbolic $1 (one dollar) for the company.

 

In 2007, the company was sold to the Farley's & Sathers  Company, which in turn merged with the Ferrara Pan  Company in 2012 to form the Ferrara  Company.

 

Products

 

The company's first product were caramels, which it produced through a process which allowed it to underprice competition, creating a large demand. This product is still a company mainstay to the present day along with a large variety of other products including a line of everyday products and special seasonal offerings.

 

Corn

Brach's  corn

Brach's  Corn is the number one selling  corn product in the United States. It is mostly associated with Halloween, but can also be bought (to a lesser degree) year round. It is available in a wide variety of flavors such as Pumpkin Spice, S'mores and Caramel.

Conversation Hearts

Brach's Conversation Hearts are small heart-shaped sugar candies sold around Valentine's Day. Each conversation heart is printed with a message such as "Be Mine", "Kiss Me", "Call Me" and "Miss You". They are now being made in a number of sizes and themes including Emoticon and Alphabet hearts.

Nougats

Brach's chewy sweet confections are available seasonally in different flavors. The flavors vary from year to year but in recent years there have been Peppermint, Wintergreen and Cinnamon for the Christmas season,  Corn flavored for Halloween, Ice Cream flavors for Easter.

Jelly Bird Eggs

Brach's Original Jelly Bird Eggs are an Easter season mainstay. In addition to the Original mix, they are available in Spiced, Speckled, Orchard Fruit and Sour flavors. For the 2015 Easter season, they also released Tiny and Jumbo sized version of the Classic flavor mix.

Chocolates

 

In addition to the variety of seasonal products, Brach's is known for their long tradition of chocolates. Malt Balls, Double Dipped Peanuts, Almond Sremes and the ever popular Bridge Mix are among the many offerings.

 

Brach's Bridge Mix

Other Sweet Treats

 

Brach's is known for year round candies as well. Brach's Star Brite Mints being among the best known of all of them. Also produced are Caramel Royals, Lemon Drops, Spice Drops and Maple Nut Goodies and many more.

See also

Helen Brach

 

References

 

1.  ^ "Farley's & Sathers acquires Brach's".  & Snack Business. 2007-11. Retrieved 2008-07-27. Check date values in: |date= (help)[dead link]

2.^   to: a b c d Leslie Goddard (2012). Chicago's Sweet  History. Arcadia Publishing. pp. 9, 25–26, 71–73,86,90,94,118. ISBN 978-0-7385-9382-1.

3.^   to: a b c E.J. Brach: A Misadventure in  Land. Dr. Robert Ginsburg, Xiaochang Jin, and Sheila McCann. Midwest Center for Labor Research. May, 1994

4.  ^ Kristen Kridel; Monique Garcia (2007-08-30). "That's a Wrap". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 2014-07-03.

5.  ^ Financial Times. September 20, 1990

6.^   to: a b Arrogance Goethe Before A Fall. Amy Feldman. Forbes. September 30, 1991

7.  ^ Brach gets its 3rd CEO in 18 months. George Lazarus. On marketing. Chicago Tribune. July 28, 1993

8.  ^ Sales Tumble As U.S.  Market Grows. Merrill goozner. Chicago Tribune. April 22, 1990

9.  ^ Signs of Trouble Dogging E.J. Brach. Frederick Lowe. Chicago Sun-Times. February 22, 1994

 

External links

Ferrara  Company website

Brach's website

Confectionery products of Ferrara  Company

 Atomic Fireball ·

 Bobs Candies ·

 Brach's ·

 Chuckles ·

 Sathers ·

 Fruit Stripe ·

 Jujyfruits ·

 Jujubes ·

 Jaw Busters ·

 Lemonhead ·

 Now and Later ·

 Original Boston Baked Beans ·

 Rain-Blo ·

 Red Hots ·

 Ser Bubble ·

 Trolli USA

 Categories: Brand name confectionery

Companies established in 1904

Companies based in Dallas, Texas

Confectionery companies of the United States

Farley's & Sathers  Company brands

 

Lemonhead is a brand of , first introduced in 1962, produced by the Ferrara  Company. Lemonheads are a round, lemon-flavored  consisting of a sweet coating, soft sour shell, and a hard  core.

 

Inspiration for the Lemonhead name came from Salvatore Ferrara seeing his grandson, Salvatore II, the third generation, after delivery. Salvatore II was a forceps baby and he noted that his new grandson's head was lemon-shaped. The  was born out of the same cold panned process as the company's Red Hots in 1962. They are most commonly sold in their standard 1 centimeter size, but are also produced in a single-sale 3 cm version. Ferrara now makes 500 million Lemonheads per year.

 

Some time between the 1980s and late 1990s, Ferrara Pan brought all of their fruit-flavored candies under a consistent naming convention: Lemonheads, Grapeheads (formerly Alexander the Grape), Cherryheads (formerly Cherry Chan/Cherry Clan) and Appleheads (formerly Johnny Apple Treats).

 

Other candies under the Lemonhead Brand

Grapeheads

Cherryheads

Appleheads

Chewy Lemonheads and Friends

Chewy Lemonheads Tropical

Chewy Lemonheads Fruit Mix

Chewy Lemonheads Flavor Fusers

Lemonhead Gummies

External links

Lemonhead Website

How Lemon Heads are made

Confectionery products of Ferrara  Company

 Atomic Fireball ·

 Bobs Candies ·

 Brach's ·

 Chuckles ·

 Sathers ·

 Fruit Stripe ·

 Jujyfruits ·

 Jujubes ·

 Jaw Busters ·

 Lemonhead ·

 Now and Later ·

 Original Boston Baked Beans ·

 Rain-Blo ·

 Red Hots ·

 Ser Bubble ·

 Trolli USA

 

Categories: 1962 introductions

Ferrara  Company brands

Brand name confectionery

 

 

Chuckles is a confectionery produced by Heides Quality Candies. Chuckles are jelly candies coated with a light layer of sugar. They come in five flavors: cherry, lemon, lime, orange, and licorice.[1] Each package of Chuckles contains one piece of each flavor, in the order cherry, lemon, licorice, orange, lime. The candies are made with corn syr, sugar, modified and unmodified cornstarch, and natural and artificial flavors and colors.

 

The Chuckles brand was first produced in 1921 by Fred W. Amend. The only factory was in Danville, IL. Nabisco bought the Chuckles Company in 1970. A management buyout occurred in 1986, and the company was quickly acquired by Leaf. Leaf's US properties were sold to The Hershey Company in 1996, and Hershey sold Chuckles to Farley's & Sathers in 2002, and merged with Ferrara Pan in 2012, forming the Ferrara  Company.[2] The standard pack of Chuckles has five colors: red, green, yellow, orange, and black. With colors such as red indicating the flavor cherry, and green indicated the flavor of lime. Some packs contain only a just single type of flavor, most popular being the cherry flavor. Also available are Chuckles Minis in classic flavors and occasional seasonal varieties.[3]

 

References

 

1.  ^ "Farley's and Sathers  Company - Chuckles page". Retrieved August 7, 2011.

2.  ^ Pollard, Garland. "Chuckles  Still a Pectin-Packed Package". BrandlandUSA. BrandlandUSA. Retrieved 20 April 2015.

3.  ^ http://www.snackmemory.com/chuckles/

 

External links

Ferrara  product page

Chuckles  product page

Confectionery products of Ferrara  Company

Atomic Fireball ·

 Bobs Candies ·

 Brach's ·

 Chuckles ·

 Sathers ·

 Fruit Stripe ·

 Jujyfruits ·

 Jujubes ·

 Jaw Busters ·

 Lemonhead ·

 Now and Later ·

 Original Boston Baked Beans ·

 Rain-Blo ·

 Red Hots ·

 Ser Bubble ·

 Trolli USA

 

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Categories: Farley's & Sathers  Company brands

1921 introductions

Confectionery stubs

Now and Later is a brand of fruit-flavored taffy-like  manufactured by Ferrara  Company. The  is formed into squares packaged in colorful paper. The original Now and Later colors were red, green and blue and many more. Throughout its lifetime, Now and Later has developed many unique flavors (see list below). Nineteen flavors are currently available in both the Traditional and Chewy variety.[1]

 

The slogan "Share the Square", replaced the original "Eat Some Now, Kid."[citation needed]

 

Contents  [hide]

1 History

2 Now and Later flavors

3 References

4 External links

History

 

The Phoenix Company goes back to 1919, when a little  company in Brooklyn, New York, was turning out penny saltwater taffy. In 1953, Harry and Joseph Klein, a New York father and son team purchased the Phoenix  Company from Charles Cari. The company was originally located in the Bush Terminal neighborhood of Brooklyn, in New York City. They began manufacturing Atlantic City style Salt-Water Taffy, Peanut Brittle and Halloween . In 1962, the Kleins brought in vacuum cookers to replace open fire kettles to save on cooking and cooling time. They brought in a German-made machine that produced 150 bars a minute and began production of Now and Later taffy  bars. The name was selected to suggest to customers that they eat some of the taffy squares in the bar right away and save the rest for another occasion.[1] By 1976, the Kleins had expanded the business to 16 machines which ran 2 shifts per day, six days a week. In 1978, Joseph Klein sold the Phoenix  Company to Beatrice Foods.

 

On March 16, 1978 the Fortnightly Club of Redlands wrote the following about Joseph Klein:[2]

 

Joseph Klein is considered a man of great ingenuity and business acumen. He expanded his Brooklyn-based, salt-water taffy business into a multi-million dollar  business. Few of us have heard of the copyrighted name, "Now and Later". It is a ten-cent  bar of nine beige-colored squares.  bars are generally consumed in a few minutes. This bar, being taffy and being divided into nine portions, gives about thirty minutes of delectable, drooling, many-flavored, teeth-decaying chewing. The "kids" could eat some now and save some for later. Hence the name, "Now and Later". "Now and Later" was the "brain-child" of Joseph Klein. The October 15, 1976, Forbes quotes Mr. Klein: "In the salt-water taffy business (his original business) you work ten months of a year and ship two months, so you need a lot of capital and you're constantly building inventories. We decided that the secret of this business would be something you could ship year-round and get paid for in ten days." The something was the "Now and Later". A trial run of the  bar in New York was a success. Now Joseph Klein had to find a machine to produce the bar economically.

 

He found it in Germany. It could produce 150 bars a minute. Again quoting Mr. Klein in the Forbes article: "In September or October of 1966 the product took off. From then on we were buying one or two machines a year. We had a tiger by the tail and we had to keep  with it."

 

And keep it, they did! In 1976 Mr. Klein had sixteen  making machines that ran two shifts each day, six days a week. Each machine makes 150 bar a minute. If my computer is correct, Mr. Joseph Klein produces over two million bars each day. Barring (no pun) breakdowns and strikes, that is about 700 million  bars annually. What a lot of tooth aches! And all from Joseph Klein!

 

The company merged with Leaf in 1983, and sold it to Nabisco in 1992. Farley's & Sathers  Company bought it in 2000 following Kraft/ Philip Morris acquisition of Nabisco. In 2012 Farley's & Sathers  Company merged with Ferrara Pan  Company and the name of the company was changed to Ferrara  Company.[3] Now and Later's are currently produced by Ferrara  Company.

Now and Later flavors

Note: Not all flavors are currently produced

Current Flavors as of 2015:

Apple

Banana

Blue Raspberry

Cherry

Grape

Pineapple

Strawberry

Tropical Punch

Watermelon

Apple Chewy

Banana Chewy

Blue Raspberry Chewy

Cherry Chewy

Grape Chewy

Pink Lemonade Chewy

Strawberry Chewy

Watermelon Chewy

Cherry Apple Split

Lemon Blue Raspberry Split

Lemon Lime Split

Discontinued Flavors:

Almond

Apple gum

Baja Blast

Banana/Strawberry split

Black Radberry (raspberry)

Bubble Gum

 Canes

Cherry Apple

Cherry Cola

Cherry/Apple Split

Cherry/Limeade split

Chocolate

CocoBanana-Rasmataz

Cola

Corn

Coffee Bean

Cotton

Cream Soda

Dreamberry

Edamame

Green Tingleberry

Jumbleberry

Hulaberry

Kiwi Kollapse

Lemon/Berry Split

Lime

Mango Melon

Metallica Berry

Mystery Mix

Omega

Orange

Peach Smash

Peppermint

Pickled Cabbage

Pink Lemonade

Pizza Pizzazz

Rainbow

Raspberry

Red Radberry

Red White and Blueberry

Rum Caramel

Sour Soft (Orange, Strawberry, Raspberry)

Spooky Sausage

Tapioca Surprise

Thriller

Tickle Me PinkBerry

Tropical Lemonade

Tropical Fever

Vanilla Ice

Wild Berry

Wasabi Blast

 

 

References

 

1.^   to: a b "Fun Facts". Ferrarausa.com. Retrieved 2013-10-23.[dead link]

2.  ^ "Redlands Web". Redlands Web. 2012-08-14. Retrieved 2013-10-23.

3.  ^ "Farley’s & Sathers to merge with Ferrara Pan". Star Tribune. Retrieved 2013-10-23.

 

Bobs Candies

This article does not cite any references (sources). Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (December 2009)

 

Bobs Candies are a brand of  manufactured by the Ferrara  Company.

 

Contents  [hide]

1 History

2 Products

3 References

4 External links

 

History

 

Bob's Candies was founded in Albany, Georgia by Bob McCormack in 1919. It is the largest manufacturer of striped  in the world.

 

McCormack was the first manufacturer to wrap his  in cellophane. A family member is credited with inventing a machine for twisting and cutting stick  in 1952. A year later, he invented a machine to bend it into a cane. The Keller machine revolutionized the business and created a new industry - the commercial manufacture of  canes.[1]

 

In 2005, Bob's was bought from the McCormack family by Farley & Sathers, which then merged with Ferrara Pan in 2012 to become known as Ferrara  Company.

 

Products

Sweet Stripes Soft Mints

Sweet Stripes Mint Sticks

 Canes

Mini  Canes

Peppermint Balls

Mint Lumps

Cherry Lumps

Sugar Free Butterscotch Discs

Sugar Free Starlight Mints

 

References

 

1.  ^ Bowers, Page. "Bobs Candies". New Georgia Encyclopedia. University of Georgia. Retrieved 15 April 2015.

 

Trolli

Trolli

Trolli Brand Logo.png

Product type

GmbH & Co. KG

Owner

Mederer GmbH (Herbert Mederer CEO)

Country

Fürth,  Germany

Introduced

1975

Related brands

Efruti, Gummi Bear Factory

Markets

Confectionery

Tagline

The one for fun!

Website

Trolli International

Trolli U.S.

 

Trolli is a brand which was registered in 1975 by Mederer GmbH of Germany. The main production today consists of gummy candies, marshmallows, and soft licorice gums. Trolli's headquarters are located in Fürth, Bavaria, Germany. Products are sold worldwide to more than 80 countries. Trolli runs four factories in Germany, one in the Czech Republic, one in Spain, one in China, and is currently developing another in Venezuela. The company also owns a sales office and distribution center in the United States. More than 150,000 tons of gummi  are produced yearly within the International Trolli Gro and the company has about 2500 employees.[1]

Trolli´s Export Destinations

 

 

Contents  [hide]

1 History 1.1 Mederer Gro

1.2 Expansion

1.3 TROLLI's creation

1.4 Innovation

1.5 Timeline

2 Sub-branches

3 Certifications

4 Controversy

5 Advertising projects

6 Manufacturing plants and factories 6.1 TROLLI in Fürth, Germany

6.2 Hagenow, Germany

6.3 Guangzhou China

6.4 Valencia, Spain

6.5 Pilsen, Czech Republic

6.6 Venezuela

7 Production

7.1 Production of the gummy

8 Products 8.1 Invented by Mederer)

8.2 Sour

8.3 Soft

8.4 Special

8.5 Liquorice

8.6 Extra fruity

8.7 Marshmallows

8.8 Gelatine-free

8.9 Gluten products (products made with wheat flour)

8.10 Products unsuitable for lactose-intolerance

8.11 Products suitable for vegetarians

8.12 Halal certified products

8.13 U.S. products

9 References

10 External links

History

 

Mederer Gro

 

The TROLLI company history began in 1948. Willy Mederer, father of today's owner, Herbert Mederer, began producing noodles and pasta under the company name: Willy Mederer KG. Soon thereafter, the formerly rationed sugar rules[2] (during the war), were relaxed and the range of products from the Mederer Gro could be expanded - particularly to the production of peppermint candies. Following this expansion, a sales team was created to organise the company´s marketing.Also it is not good because it make rush.

 

Expansion

 

Willy Mederer attempted to expand throughout the 1950s and 60's. As the product range widened and the number of employees increased, the Mederer Gro augmented production with new machinery to satisfy increasing demand. From then on, Willy Mederer decided to distribute products under the brand name "Wilmed." Jelly-fruits, cream drops and other products were made by 150 employees. Sales offices in Münich and Stuttgart were then created.

 

At the age of 17,[when?] Herbert Mederer, current CEO, was integrated into the company while simultaneously attending the  School of Solingen, where he studied to become a confectioner.

 

TROLLI's creation

 

Over the years, the fruit gummy  production and industry, adopted a continuously increasing status, with Haribo leading at the top of the industry. Willy Mederer was able to reinforce credibility of the company as well as give it a name by concentrating on the quality of the gummi  produced. Thus in 1975, the magenta-colored 'Trolli' logo was implemented. The character part of the logo was based on a mythical forest creature, known as a troll which was particularly fond of children. Due to the popularity of myths, tales and stories, it was expected that the name would impress and connect with children. The Fürth established company was quick for expansion and soon opened its doors worldwide. With Willy Mederer still as the head of TROLLI, the company soon took interest in the American Market. However the success of an integration into the US market would only be experienced by Willy Mederer's successor, Herbert. Willy Mederer died in 1984.

 

Innovation

 

Exports over the Atlantic were becoming a major asset to the company and soon amounted to 40 tonnes on a daily basis. 'Wurrli,' known as 'Squiggle' in the US, was the first success integrate the American market. It was not long before the TROLLI industry also adopted sour products which consisted of gummy candies coated in sugar. Following this, the Mederer Corporation decided to focus mainly on innovation; developing new shapes, colours and tastes for the candies. In 1986, Herbert Mederer built a production facility in Creston, Iowa (United States) that ensured increasing capacity with every year using cutting edge technology from both the United States and Germany.

 

One of the developments was the creation of double layered - gummy and foam - products, such as the apple rings. State-of-the-art starch mogul machines were crucial to this new creation. A second creation was the 'Trolli-Burger' of which approximately 2 billion pieces have been sold to this day. Such sales were greatly appreciated by the US  market as the Hamburger is an important part of the American food culture.[3] Herbert Mederer's ideas were soon thereafter rewarded with the 1993  Kettle Award.[4] Meanwhile consumers ensured that TROLLI sales would continue to grow. The founding of the subsidiary company TROLLI Iberica S.A. in Valencia (Spain) in 1994, and the installation of a production site in Jakarta (Indonesia) in 1997 greatly improved the Mederer Gro´s international capabilities. In order to increase packaging variety and ensure independence in that department, the Mederer Gro soon expanded towards Pilsen (Czech Republic) where TROLLI Bohemia was created.

 

Timeline

1948 - Willi Mederer began his German  company "Wilmed" with sales offices in Stuttgart and Munich.

1975 - Willi Mederer and his son, Herbert, open Trolli. The name Trolli comes from Trolls (forest creatures that are fond of children). The German mascot for the  is a Troll with rainbow hair.

1975 - Trolli targets the American market.

1984 - Willi Mederer passes away.

1986 - Herbert Mederer opens production facility in Creston, Iowa.

1994 - The subsidiary Trolli Iberica SA in Valencia is established.

1996 - Favorite Brands International buys Trolli U.S.

1997 - Production facility in Jakarta (Indonesia) is opened.

1998 - Efrutti is launched.

1999 - Nabisco buys Favorite Brands.

2000 - Philip Morris buys Nabisco and merges it with Kraft Foods.

Summer 2004 - Trolli Road Kill  is introduced to the US market.

March 2005 - Trolli Road Kill  causes controversy.

March 2005 - Kraft pulls Trolli Road Kill  from the market.

June 2005 - Wrigleys buys Trolli U.S. from Kraft.

January 2006 - Wrigleys sells Trolli U.S. to Farley's & Sathers  Company, Inc.

August 2010 - Trolli sponsors SpVgg Greuther Fürth and the respective football stadium is subsequently named Trolli Arena.

January 2013 - Farley's & Sathers Merges with Ferrara Pan to create Ferrara  Company

 

Sub-branches

 

Efrutti, the specialist for 'premium fruit gummies', was integrated into the Mederer Gro in 1998. This was aimed towards a broadening of premium quality gummy products. With already two production sites in Boizenburg and Hagenow, Gummi Bear Factory was taken over (2000) in order to ensure production and sply at level with the continued increasing demand for TROLLI products.

 

Efrutti Logo

Certifications

IFS (International Food Standard)[5]

Hazard analysis and critical control points (HACCP)[6]

BCR (Efruti)[clarification needed][citation needed]

Halal (Spain)[7]

 

Controversy

 

In 2004, Trolli introduced a gummi  in the shape of chickens, squirrels, and snakes with tire tracks on them like they had been run over by a vehicle. Animal rights activists spoke out about the  in an effort to get it off of the market. Kraft Foods, then the owner of the Trolli US brand which had introduced this product, pulled it from the market.[8][9][10]

 

Advertising projects

Trolli Arena (Formerly Playmobil-arena)

In 2010, Trolli engaged in sponsoring SpVgg Greuther Fürth and subsequently named the team's stadium Trolli Arena.

 

Trolli also regularly produces candies for specific football teams such as Bayern Munich.[11]

Manufacturing plants and factories

TROLLI in Fürth, Germany

The Trolli factory and offices in Fürth is the main base of operations for the Mederer Gro, despite the factory being the least developed and smallest one.

 

Hagenow, Germany

 

The TROLLI infrastructure in Hagenow, consists of an exceptional warehouse in Mecklenburg-Pomerania which has now been used by the Mederer gro since 2007. It is large in size, self-sufficient, entirely automatic and extremely efficient. Keeping the warehouse  to date with the levels of production and demand is important for its effective use of time and space. Hence a good effective communication is essential between all of the plants and factories.

 

Guangzhou China

 

In order to widen export market possibilities, in 2001, Mederer built, together with the Spanish 'Multi Joyco', a new production site in Guangzhou, China. Three years later Mederer took over 100% of the Joint Venture and gave it a new name: TROLLI Guangzhou Confectionery Co. Ltd. China. Through China, the Mederer gro gained access to neighbouring markets such as Australia and New Zealand as well as USA, Canada and Saudi Arabia.

 

Valencia, Spain

Trolli Ibérica is the main provider and producer of Halal products within the Mederer Gro.[citation needed]

Pilsen, Czech Republic

TROLLI Pilsen is the main packaging plant within the various factories.

Venezuela

The TROLLI factory in Venezuela is currently under construction.

Production

 

Gelatine is the base ingredient used to make the gummy product. Generally only the highest quality of animal gelatine is used in the production. TROLLI’s products are produced in facilities that are IFS[12] certified. The Mederer gro also includes a quality management (system) team who audit the spliers of raw materials. In addition, all of the raw materials, such as gelatine or the finished product itself, are assessed and analysed by external, accredited laboratories and independent food technologists/specialists. Traceability from the finished product, back to each raw material is thus made possible.

 

Production of the gummy

Step 1: Delivery and preparation of raw materials such as glucose, sugar, gelatine, color and aroma or flavour. All raw materials are examined on delivery before they are mixed in the ‘kitchen.’

Step 2: Mixture of the raw materials.

Step 3: Colour, aroma and acidity are all added in measured amounts.

Step 4: The gummy gelatine mix is then poured (by a machine) into powder-starch filled, wooden trays which have just previously been stamped by the specific molds of the desired gummy shape.

Step 5: The molds/trays are then stored in a closed room which is kept at 25°C with roughly 35-40% relative humidity. The starch on the gummies must have a limit of 7.5% humidity (or remaining moisture) to take the water out of the gummy mix in a limited drying time which is around 36–48 hours. Temperatures and levels are extremely important if the gummy is to be ready for packaging within the limited amount of time. If not, the gummy is likely to be too soft and may stick together.

Step 6: The gummies are then passed through an air pressure chamber where the starch is ‘blown’ off.

Step 7: The gummies are then passed through a revolving cylinder where they are coated with oil to avoid sticking to each other. Some of the gummy products are passed through an alternative revolving tunnel which also coats them with sugar (for sugar coated products, such as apple rings, peach rings).

Step 8: The gummies continue onto a moving belt where they are examined for defects.

Step 9: The gummies then continue to a multi-head weighing machine, where they are weighed into baskets and according to the amount needed per bag (i.e. 250g, 300g, 500g), various baskets of the machine are opened at the same time to attain the correct weight. The gummies then continue towards packaging.

Step 10: The gummies are then deposited into bags which are heat sealed, passed through a detection unit and then sent to the next packaging area where they are weighed once more and then boxed.

Step 11: The gummies are now ready for shipping.

 

Products

 

TROLLI includes a variety of products which can be categorized into the following sections; Original, Sour, Soft, Special, Liquorice, Extra Fruity, Marshmallows, Gelatine-free, Gluten, Vegetarian, Not for Lactose Intolerant and Halal products.

 

Invented by Mederer)

TROLLI Apfelringe (Apple Rings)

TROLLI Pfirsichringe (Peach Rings)

TROLLI Saure Glühwürmchen (Sour Glowworms)

TROLLI Mini Burger

TROLLI Glotzer Ser Sauer Gefüllt (Eyeballs – Ser Sour Filled)

Sour

TROLLI Spaghettini Apfel Sauer (Spaghettini Sour Apple)

TROLLI Spaghettini Erdbeer Sauer (Spaghettini Sour Strawberry)

TROLLI Spaghettini Cola Sauer (Spaghettini Sour Coca Cola)

TROLLI Glotzer Ser Sauer Gefüllt (Eyeballs Ser Sour Filled)

TROLLI Bizzl Mix

TROLLI Apfelringe Minis (Apple Rings Mini)

TROLLI Cassis

TROLLI Pur Citrus (Pure Citrus)

TROLLI Fisch Mix (Fish Mix)

TROLLI Ser 8

TROLLI Saurer Octopus (Sour Octopus)

TROLLI Give Me 5

TROLLI Saure Erdbeeren (Sour Strawberries)

TROLLI Stocksauer (SerSour)

TROLLI Bungees Apfel Sauer (Bungees Sour Apple)

TROLLI Bungees Erdbeer Sauer (Bungees Sour Strawberry)

TROLLI Bungees Cola Sauer (Bungees Sour Coca Cola)

TROLLI Sour Surfer

TROLLI Saure Glühwurmchen (Sour Glowworms)

TROLLI Saure Herzen (Sour Hearts)

TROLLI Sour Mini Burger

TROLLI Lemon Mallow

TROLLI Sweet & Sour

TROLLI Sour Bears

Soft

TROLLI Yofruit

TROLLI Kiss

TROLLI Wurrli

TROLLI Dracula

TROLLI Milch Kuh (Milk Cow)

TROLLI Playmouse

TROLLI Pfirsichringe Minis (Peach Rings Mini)

TROLLI Polar Kids

TROLLI Soft Ice Gums

TROLLI Putzige Pilze (Mellow Mushrooms)

TROLLI Meister Mischung (Master Mix)

TROLLI Fritzles Family Fun

TROLLI Happy Bears Day

TROLLI Colaflaschen (Coca Cola Bottles)

TROLLI Yoghurt Fruit Gums

TROLLI World Bears

TROLLI Number One

TROLLI Cola Party

TROLLI Weingummi (Wine Gums)

TROLLI Werkzeug Box (Toolbox)

TROLLI Firecracker

TROLLI Haifische (Sharks)

TROLLI Spiegeleier (Fried Eggs)

TROLLI Muscheln (Mussels)

TROLLI Schlangen (Snakes)

TROLLI Riesen Boa (Giant Boa’s)

TROLLI Ohrwurm (Ear Worms)

TROLLI Frösche (Frogs)

TROLLI Vambär & Flugsau (Vampire Bears & Flying Pigs)

TROLLI Sprüche-Armband (Bracelets)

TROLLI Tatzelwurm (Millipede)

TROLLI Brezeln (Pretzels)

TROLLI Sprüche-Klopfer (Loud Mouth)

TROLLI Seesterne (Sea Stars)

TROLLI Hasenland (Bunny Land)

TROLLI Ostereier (Easter Eggs)

TROLLI Buntes Osternest (Color Easternest)

TROLLI Ostermix (EasterMix)

TROLLI Funny Bunny

TROLLI Frohe Ostern (Happy Easter)

TROLLI Osterfest (Easter Party)

TROLLI Winter Wonderland

TROLLI Frohe Weihnachten (Merry Christmas)

TROLLI Weihnachtsmarkt (Christmas Market)

TROLLI Santa’s Gummi Mix

TROLLI Schlittenpartie (Sledge Party)

TROLLI Sweet Lips

TROLLI Big Balloon

TROLLI Gummi Racers

TROLLI Cheesecake

TROLLI Soft & Fruity

TROLLI Schnuller (Pacifiers)

TROLLI Wine Gums

Special

TROLLI Gumballs

TROLLI Halal Gummi Bears

TROLLI Halal Gummi Fruit Salad

TROLLI Halal Gummi Orange Slices

TROLLI Halal Sour Peach Hearts

TROLLI Gute Nacht Schäfchen (Good Night Dream Sheep)

TROLLI Gummi World

TROLLI Gummi World Bears

TROLLI Gummi World Cola

TROLLI Multi Mix

TROLLI Hot Dog

TROLLI Mini Pops

TROLLI All In One

 

Liquorice

TROLLI Lakritz Mix (Liquorice Mix)

TROLLI Lakritz Stark (Liquorice Strong)

TROLLI Lakritz Extra Stark (Liquorice Extra Strong)

Extra fruity

TROLLI Cassis

TROLLI Prosecco Pops

TROLLI Lemon Quarks

TROLLI Walderdbeeren (Wild Strawberries)

TROLLI Saft Gummis (Juice Gums)

TROLLI Vitaminzwerge (Vitamin Dwarfs)

TROLLI Beerentraum (Heavenly Berry)

TROLLI ‘Trolli with Love’

TROLLI Ring O’s

TROLLI Serfruits

 

Marshmallows

TROLLI Mallow Pops

TROLLI Choco Bananas (Chocolate Filled Bananas)

TROLLI Apple Mallow (Fruchtiger Füllung - Fruity Filling)

TROLLI Peach Mallow (Fruchtiger Füllung - Fruity Filling)

TROLLI Lemon Mallow (Sauer – Sour)

TROLLI Red Pops

Gelatine-free

TROLLI Bizzl Mix

TROLLI Sour Strawberries

TROLLI Give Me 5

TROLLI Evil Twins

TROLLI Sour Surfer

TROLLI Spaghettini Apfel Sauer (Spaghettini Sour Apple)

TROLLI Spaghettini Erdbeer Sauer (Spaghettini Sour Strawberry)

TROLLI Spaghettini Cola Sauer (Spaghettini Sour Coca Cola)

TROLLI Bungees Apfel Sauer (Bungees Sour Apple)

TROLLI Bungees Erdbeer Sauer (Bungees Sour Strawberry)

TROLLI Bungees Cola Sauer (Bungees Sour Coca Cola)

 

Gluten products (products made with wheat flour)

TROLLI Bungees Apfel (Bungees Apple)

TROLLI Bungees Erdbeer (Bungees Strawberry)

TROLLI Bungees Cola (Bungees Coca Cola)

TROLLI Bungees Apfel Sauer (Bungees Apple Sour)

TROLLI Bungees Erdbeer Sauer (Bungees Strawberry Sour)

TROLLI Bungees Cola Sauer (Bungees Coca Cola Sour)

Diverse Lakritzartikel (Various Liquorice products)

Products unsuitable for lactose-intolerance

TROLLI Milchkuh (Milk Cow)

TROLLI Yofruit

TROLLI Sour Fruit Shake

TROLLI Yoghurt Fruits

TROLLI Soft Ice

Products suitable for vegetarians

(the gelling agent is not gelatine but either starch or pectin)

TROLLI Bungees Apfel (Bungees Apple)

TROLLI Bungees Erdbeer (Bungees Strawberry)

TROLLI Bungees Cola (Bungees Coca Cola)

TROLLI Bungees Apfel Sauer (Bungees Apple Sour)

TROLLI Bungees Erdbeer Sauer (Bungees Strawberry Sour)

TROLLI Bungees Cola Sauer (Bungees Coca Cola Sour)

TROLLI Bizzl Mix

TROLLI Saure Erdbeeren (Sour Strawberries)

TROLLI Give Me 5

Halal certified products

TROLLI Halal orange slices

TROLLI Halal Fruit Salad

TROLLI Halal Gummi Bears

TROLLI Halal Sour Peach Hearts

TROLLi Soda Poppers

 

U.S. products

Squiggles (gummi worms)

Play Mouse

Classic Bears

Strawberry Puffs

Melon-Os

Peachie-os

Tropic-Os

Apple-Os

Sour Brite Crawlers (sour gummi worms)

Sour Brite Crawler Eggs

Sour Brite Rocks (new)

Sour Gecko

Stinging Red Ants

Sour Brite Octopus

Cherry Bombers

Sour Brite Caterpillars

Mini-Fries

Mini-Burgers

Mini-Hotdogs

Mini-Pizzas

Tangy Tongue

Tayo Ajadi

Glotzer

Sour Brite Gummy Rocks

Little Green Men

 

References

 

1.  ^ Presse-Information, Mederer Süßwarenvertriebs GmbH - Fürth, November 2009

2.  ^ http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h1674.html

3.  ^ http://www.popsense.com/2008/07/hamburger-salute-to-american-culture.html

4.  ^ http://halloffame.org/CHoF/inductees/2003/herbert-w-mederer.shtml

5.  ^ http://www.webislam.com/?idt=8896

6.  ^ http://www.cs-retailing.com/Articles/Manufacturing/2010/05/21/Catch-em-if-You-Can

7.  ^ http://m.halalstock.com/Company.asp?sID=6562

8.  ^ Kraft Pulls Trolli Roadkill

9.  ^ Firm hits brakes on ‘road kill’

10.  ^ 'Roadkill' sweets grind to a halt

11.  ^ http://blog.nz-online.de/club/files/2009/11/trolli.jpg

12.  ^ http://www.bsi-emea.com/Food+Safety/Standards/IFS.xalter

 

BBC.co.uk: "'Roadkill' sweets grind to a halt"

“Kraft Pulls Trolli Roadkill ” AllBusiness.com. 2 March 2005. Retrieved 12 November 2009.

“Political correctness can be deadly for new products” AllBusiness.com. 1 May 2005. Retrieved 12 November 2009.

History Trolli. Retrieved 12 November 2009.

"Wrigley Sells North American Trolli Business" AllBusiness.com. 28 November 2005. Retrieved 12 November 2009.

"F & S buys Trolli, drops brokers" CBS Interactive, Inc. November 2005. Retrieved 12 November 2009.

http://trolli.de/produkte.php

http://trolli.de/unternehmen.php

Mederer GmbH. Product Management

 

 

Rain-Blo is a brand of bubble gum that come in a variety of fruit flavors, introduced by Leaf Confectionery in 1940, and acquired from Hershey Foods by Farley's & Sathers  Company, merged with Ferrara Pan in 2012, becoming the Ferrara  Company. They are bubble gum balls containing an internal fruit flavoring that is colored to match the coating on the outside.

 

Rain-Blo gum balls are also available in a larger "king size", marketed as Jum-Blo. Classic Rain-Blo gum balls weigh 4.8 grams, while Jum-Blo gum balls weigh 10.2 grams.

 

Jujyfruits are a chewy, gumdrop-like starch-based , manufactured by Ferrara  Company. Jujyfruits began production in 1920.[1] They were popular in movie houses along with Heide's other gummy , Jujubes.[1]

 

 

Contents  [hide]

1 Description

2 Ingredients

3 Brand extension

4 In popular culture

5 External links

6 References

Description

 

 

 An assortment of Jujyfruits.

The Jujyfruits shapes are Pineapple, Tomato, Raspberry, Grape Bundle, Asparagus Bundle, Banana, and Pea Pod.[1] The banana shape is stamped with "HEIDE." Fruity flavors correspond to the colors (not the shapes) and include raspberry (red), anise/licorice (black), lime (green), orange (orange), and lemon (yellow).[1] The candies are firm and harden with age or when chilled. A sour variety is also available.

 

Prior to January 1999, the green sweets were mint flavoured. Hershey (the parent company at the time) changed them to lime after a customer survey found that mint was not a popular flavor.

 

Ingredients

 

One of the basic ingredients of both Jujubes and Jujyfruits was 'Ju-ju gum'.[2] This is sported by the fact that the original Jujubes box lists 'natural gum' as its first ingredient. As of 2009, the ingredients listed on Jujyfruits boxes are:

Corn syr

Sugar

Modified and unmodified cornstarch

Natural and artificial flavors

White mineral oil

Carnauba wax

Caramel color

Artificial colors (Yellow 6, Blue 1, Yellow 5 and Red 40)

 

Brand extension

Jujyfruits package design circa 1977 with the belt buckle promotion.

In the 1970s, Jujyfruits held a promotion where if a token from a Jujyfruits carton and five dollars was sent to the Heide  Company, a brass buckle and leather belt would be sent in return.[3]

In popular culture

Jujyfruits were featured in the season five episode of Seinfeld titled "The Opposite".

External links

Jujyfruit  Website

Official Ferrara  Website

 

References

 

1.^   to: a b c "Farley's & Sathers  Company, Inc. - Who We Are". Farley's & Sathers  Company, Inc. Retrieved 2010-04-07.

2.  ^ "Jujyfruits -  you ate as a kid". Old Time . Retrieved 2010-04-07.

3.  ^ "Jujyfruits Promotion". The  Wrapper Museum. Retrieved 2010-04-07.

 

 

Fruit Stripe is an artificially and naturally flavored fruit chewing gum notorious for its strong but fleeting flavor. It proudly claims to be the only gum with painted-on stripes, and is packaged in zebra-striped wrapper temporary tattoos.

Fruit Stripe Gum

Contents  [hide]

1 History

2 Flavors

3 Mascots

4 Promotions

5 In popular culture

6 References

7 External links

 

 

History

 

The "Five Flavor Gum" was invented by James Parker and launched in early 1969 as an extension of the Beech-Nut gum line. Farley's & Sathers  Company acquired Fruit Stripe in 2003 from The Hershey Company. Farley's & Sathers merged with Ferrara Pan in 2012, forming the Ferrara  Company.

 

Flavors

 

Two five-flavor packs of Fruit Stripe are currently produced:[citation needed]

1.Cherry, lemon, orange, mixed fruit, and lime

2.Cherry, grape, mixed fruit, lemon, and cotton

 

In the late 1970s, there was a chocolate version called Chocolate Stripe.[1]

 

Mascots

 

A character known as the Fruit Stripe Gum Man promoted the product as late as 1967;[2] he merely consisted of an anthropomorphic gum pack with limbs and a face. The Stripes Family Animals, which included a zebra, Connor the tiger, elephant, and mouse, were also used in advertising and featured in a coloring book and plush toys.[3][4]

 

However, a cartoon zebra named Yipes has outlasted the other characters to become Fruit Stripe's long-standing, sole mascot. Wrappers contain tattoos of Yipes inline skating, playing baseball, hang gliding, playing basketball, bicycling, snowboarding, surfing, playing soccer, playing tennis, and eating grass. In 1988, Yipes was made into a promotional bendy figure which, according to FarleysandSathers.com, is currently valued at approximately $30–$50 in collector marketplaces.

 

Yipes is shown prominently on fruit stripe gum packaging. Yipes is often shown as a sports player, playing basketball or soccer on the gum's packaging.[5]

 

Promotions

 

In 1996, Fruit Stripe gave five cents from the sale of each Jumbo Pack and Variety Multipack to the World Wildlife Fund, totaling  to $100,000, for the preservation of endangered animals and their habitats.[1]

Some packs of Fruit Stripe gum include temporary tattoos.

In popular culture

The Beastie Boys compared their band's "flavor" to Fruit Stripe on their song "B-Boy Bouillabaisse" on the album Paul's Boutique.

In the feature film Home Alone 2: Lost in New York, Macaulay Culkin's character, Kevin, gives a piece of Fruit Stripe gum as a "tip" to a bellboy (played by Rob Schneider).

In the television sitcom King of Queens, Season 6, Episode 6, "Affidavit Justice," Doug mentions that his shirt looks like a package of Fruit Stripe gum. A similar joke is made in an episode of the sitcom That '70s Show by Donna regarding Eric's shirt.

The Peepers brand of reading glasses offers a colorful set of "Fruit Stripe Gum" frames.[6]

 

In "Play It Again, Brian", a Season 6 episode of the animated television series Family Guy, a cutaway makes reference to the short-living flavor of Fruit Stripe.

 

References

 

1.^   to: a b Who We Are, FarleysandSathers.com

2.  ^ Fruit Stripe Gum Man with motorcycle, AdvertisingIconMuseum.org. Retrieved on 2-25-09.

3.  ^ Food Character Premiums, TheImaginaryWorld.com. Retrieved on 2-25-09.

4.  ^ Yipes! Stripes! Retrieved on 2-25-09.

5.  ^ Fruit Stripe at snackmemory.com

6.  ^ Fruit-Striped-Gum Peepers Reading Glasses, Peeperspecs.com. Retrieved on 2009-02-25.

 

Ser Bubble is a brand of bubble gum manufactured by Ferrara  Company.

Original Flavor Ser Bubble Gum

In addition to the original flavor, Ser Bubble also comes in apple, grape, and watermelon flavors. The recipe for Ser Bubble bubble gum is actually the recipe for a much older brand, known as Bub's Daddy, originating with the now Bub's Daddy bubble gum company.

 

Ser Bubble was developed by the Thomas Weiner Company shortly after World War II in the 1940s. The five-cent product was a huge success, but in the face of increased competition, the company brought out a one-cent version in 1948.

 

Over the years, the brand has changed hands many times. General Mills acquired Ser Bubble in 1969. The gum line was later sold to Leaf and was acquired by Hershey in the 1996 acquisition of Leaf. Farley's & Sathers  Company bought it from Hershey's a few years ago. In 2012, Farley & Sathers merged with Ferrara Pan to become Ferrara  Company who continues to produce the gum today.

 

External links

Official Ferrara  Website

Ser Bubble Website

 

Farley's & Sathers  Company was created as an umbrella company to roll- many small companies, brands and products under a common management team.[1] The confectionery business segment is made  of many small companies, often with intertwined relationships and histories.

 

Selection of Farley and Sathers product

Catterton Partners formed the Farley's & Sathers  Company in 2002 as a vehicle for the purchase of some of the former Farley Foods Company and Sathers  Company assets and brands from Kraft.[1]

Since that time, additional brands and businesses have been added to the roster.

In 2012, the owners of Farley's & Sathers, Catterton Partners, purchased Ferrara Pan  Company. Catterton Partners retained controlling interest in the company, and the name of the company was changed to Ferrara .[2]

Contents  [hide]

1 History 1.1 Roots of the Company 1.1.1 Sathers

1.1.2 Farley

1.2 Favorite Brands International 1.2.1 Kraft business lines acquisition

1.2.2 Sathers  and Farley Foods acquisitions

1.2.3 Kidd Marshmallows

1.2.4 Dae Julie acquisition

1.2.5 North American Trolli acquisition 1.2.5.1 Favorite Brands

1.3 Farley's and Sathers 1.3.1 Brands purchased from Hershey 1.3.1.1 Henry Heide

1.3.1.2 Chuckles

1.3.1.3 Amazin' Fruit

1.3.2 Brands purchased from Kraft 1.3.2.1 Now and Later

1.3.2.2 Intense Fruit Chews

1.3.3 Gum brands purchased from Hershey 1.3.3.1 RainBlo

1.3.3.2 Fruit Stripe

1.3.3.3 Hot Dog!

1.3.3.4 Ser Bubble

1.3.4 Bobs Candies

1.3.5 North American Trolli re-acquisition

1.3.6 Brach and Brock  1.3.6.1 Brock  Company

1.3.6.2 E.J. Brach's

1.3.6.3 Brach's Confections acquisition

1.3.7 Ferrara Pan  1.3.7.1 Ferrara Pan  acquisition

2 Ferrara , née Farley's & Sathers, today

3 Timeline

4 References

5 External links

History

 

Under Favorite Brands ownership the Farley and Sathers first joined with the Dae Julie Company and Trolli. Under Favorite Brands' management, Dae Julie was rolled into the Farley division while Sathers and Trolli remained as separate divisions. Favorite Brands was eventually acquired by Nabisco, and then shortly afterwards, Nabisco itself was merged with Kraft Foods.

 

After the merger, as Kraft divested brands, divisions, and assets, Farley & Sathers emerged as a new company in its own right though shorn of a few key business units. The North American Trolli operation, which had been retained by Kraft, was eventually sold to the Wrigley Company, who subsequently sold it to Farley & Sathers. Much of the history of these companies is intertwined: Sathers bought much of its bulk  splies from Farley; the growth of Farley Foods before Favorite Brands was in no small part due to the implosion of E.J. Brach's which itself became part of the new Farley's and Sathers organization; the problems at Favorite Brands could be partially attributed to a resurgent E.J. Brach's after it merged with the Brock of Chattanooga  company to become "Brach and Brock". When sold by Kraft, Farley lost its fruit snack business[3] but kept the Dae Julie gummi plant; with Farley & Sathers' purchase of the Brach and Brock company, it regained a fruit snack business though it had lost its advantage as first to market in the category. Many plants and distribution facilities were closed, consolidated, or replaced over time.

Roots of the Company

Sathers

Examples of Sathers product

John Sather, a local grocer in Round Lake, Minnesota, established the Sather Company in 1936.[4] He purchased trainloads of cookies to sell to stores throughout southwestern Minnesota.[5]

 

By the early 1960s, Sathers distributed products to the five-state Midwest region. The territory grew and product lines and operations changed to include the addition of a nut roasting operation in the 1960s. With the addition of telemarketing in 1967, the customer territory expanded to eleven Midwest states. With this increase, Sathers added tractor trailer units to its trucking fleet.[6]

 

Sathers was primarily a rebagger.[7] Rebaggers purchase product in bulk, in pallet-quantities or container loads if imported, and repackage it into smaller retail packaging. One source Sathers used was Farley  Company though many other sources were used as well. Many of its chocolate products were provided by the Haviland  Company, a division of NECCO.

 

The Sathers company is considered to be the innovator behind packaged "pegboard" or "hanging bag" , now one of the  industry's primary marketing programs for general line candies. Another innovation was the telemarketing system it implemented when its sales force quit en masse due to low wages. The sales people had been required to not only sell the product, but also to deliver it and stock it on store shelves. Sathers' telemarketing initiative is considered one of the earliest implementations of this process, where orders were taken by phone and the customers would unpack and stock the shelves themselves.[8]

 

The company continued to expand and in 1972, Sathers went nationwide with product distribution when it secured half of the national Kmart business. When it acquired Chattanooga-based Kitchen Fresh Company in 1983, the remainder of Kmart's national business became Sathers'. Sathers' expansion continued with the company purchasing the Bayou  Division of the American  Company in 1985; Powell's  Company (of Hopkins, Minnesota) and Northstar  Company (of Rogers, Minnesota) were both acquired in 1991. Sathers now had three manufacturing facilities—(a nut roasting and processing plant in Chattanooga, Tennessee and two confectionery plants in Hopkins, Minnesota and in New Orleans, Louisiana)—in addition to their two distribution centers.[8][9][10]

 

Farley

 

In 1870, Gunther Farley and two of his brothers founded Gunther Chocolate Company. Gunther Chocolate Company later merged with another, smaller, Farley-family-owned  company in 1891, becoming Farley  Company.[11]

Example of product produced by the panning process; multiple layers of coatings are gradually added to a core within a large spinning pan. The core can be chocolate, a nut, or almost anything edible.

As it grew, Farley  moved its operations from North Franklin Street in Chicago, then to Serior Street, and then, in 1951, to the north suburb of Skokie. It passed to a third generation of the Farley family, represented by Preston Farley, who managed it until 1968. In that year, Preston Farley sold a majority interest in the company to Raymond Underwood.[12]

 

During the Preston Farley and Underwood years Farley was primarily a manufacturer of jell and other products, manufactured in starch moguls;[13] Farley also produced cinnamon imperials, a panned product, and a line of hard candies including sanded lemon hard . Preston Farley invented the Farley Jet Cooker, subsequently licensed to the Staley Company. The Jet Cooker is still manufactured under the name of the Staley Jet Cooker, and is still used today in the manufacture of confections and paper.

 

In 1974, William Ellis purchased 100% of the company. In the same year he purchased the Lakeside  Company, located in Zion, Illinois and commonly known as Zion , which produced a full line of individually wrapped hard candies such as starlight mints and butterscotches.

Example of product purchased in bulk from other manufacturers and repackaged for resale

In 1981, Farley was operating out of its plants in Skokie and Zion, Illinois when a third plant was added. A 103,000-square-foot (9,600 m2) plant, formerly used to produce the York Peppermint Pattie and Power House bar was purchased from Peter Paul-Cadbury. This plant became Farley  Company's primary chocolate manufacturing site, though it also produced other products.[8]

 

In 1985, Farley bought a vacant 265,000-square-foot (24,600 m2) warehouse in Chicago on 31st Street, and converted it for confection manufacturing. This large plant became the primary manufacturing facility for Farley when it came online in June 1986. This plant was used primarily to manufacture a newly emerging category of : Fruit snacks, and later, Fruit Rolls. Fruit Snacks were manufactured using the same equipment and processes as gummy candies, using real fruit juice as an ingredient and vitamins added, formed and molded in starch moguls. As gummi candies became more popular, this plant and equipment was used to meet rising demand for those products as well.[14]

 

In 1988, Farley’s took over the operations of Jaffe , located in Compton, California, establishing a 50,000-square-foot (4,600 m2) packaging and distribution center on the West Coast. Also in 1988, Farley's leased a 253,000-square-foot (23,500 m2) warehouse distribution center in Bedford Park, Illinois. With four  manufacturing plants and two distribution centers, Farley  Company was the second largest bag  manufacturer in the United States and was the largest private label general line  manufacturer.

 

In 1990, Farley purchased a 142,000-square-foot (13,200 m2), former E.J. Brach's factory, located in Melrose Park, Illinois. This plant was used for a wide range of products, but primarily produced hard candies, eventually replacing the plant in Zion, Illinois and concentrating production facilities within a smaller radius of the company's warehouse/distribution center.[15] One of the main products produced on state-of-the-art equipment at this plant was Starlight Mints, at a much lower cost than those from competitors such as E.J. Brach, for which it was a mainstay product.[16][17]

 

In 1993, facing capacity shortages, Farley (which had changed its name to Farley Foods USA to allow for future expansion to products outside of confections) purchased a 144,000-square-foot (13,400 m2) manufacturing plant in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma along with a 100,000-square-foot (9,300 m2) warehouse in Moore, Oklahoma. These buildings had been the main production and warehouse facilities of the Bunte  Company. They were sold to the American  Company in 1990, which then sold them to Farley.[18]

 

In 1994, Farley leased a 480,000-square-foot (45,000 m2) warehouse and distribution center on 43rd Street in Chicago which was closer to expressways and to its major production facility at 31st Street. This new warehouse replaced the 253,000-square-foot (23,500 m2) Bedford Park facility.[19][20]

 

In September 1995, William Ellis received a heart transplant at the age of 71.[21] In August 1996, Farley Foods was sold to Favorite Brands International with Mr. Ellis taking a 14.3% ownership stake in the new company.[22]

Favorite Brands International

Farley and Sathers first came together under the Favorite Brands International name in 1996. Favorite Brands had been created a year earlier, in 1995, with the purchase of confectionery business units from Kraft Foods.[23]

 

Favorite Brands International - Acquisitions

(intercompany sales eliminated - million $'s)

Kraft Marshmallow &  September 25, 1995 $204 $151

Farley Foods August 30, 1996 $204 $284

Sathers  & Trucking August 30, 1996 $107 $166

Kidd & Company August 30, 1996 $30 $33

Dae Julie & land January 27, 1997 $42 $56

Mederer U.S. - Trolli April 1, 1997 $117 $62

Favorite Brands was allowed to use the Kraft brand name for 2 years after the business was purchased. Beginning September 1, 1997 the use of the Kraft brand name was to end. This is a selection of Favorite Brands product showing the effect of the change.

Kraft business lines acquisition

 

Favorite Brands International (FBI) was formed in July, 1995 to purchase the branded and private label caramel and marshmallow businesses from Kraft Foods for an estimated $204 million.[24] It was funded with investments from the Texas Pacific Gro (TPG) and InterWest Partners.[8]

 

With the purchase of the Kraft business units, Favorite Brands became the largest manufacturer of marshmallows and the leading manufacturer of wrapped caramel products in North America. They also produced a significant percentage of the private label marshmallows sold. The Kraft caramel business enjoyed a marketshare greater than 50% at the time of the purchase, while the Kraft branded marshmallows enjoyed a marketshare greater than 60%. In addition to consumer  and marshmallows, Favorite Brands also acquired the industrial caramel and marshmallow businesses of Kraft. This business splied the dehydrated marshmallows (with a 98% share of the market),[23] marshmallow creme and caramel for use in breakfast cereals, instant hot chocolate mixes and taffy apples. Favorite Brands received film credit for splying the truckloads of marshmallow creme used in the film What Dreams May Come.

 

With the acquisition came a confectionery manufacturing facility located in Kendallville, Indiana. Built in the 1920s and situated on 32 acres (130,000 m2), this became the main manufacturing facility after 4 other Kraft marshmallow manufacturing lines were relocated from Buena Park, California, Canada and Garland, Texas (2 lines).

Sathers  and Farley Foods acquisitions

In 1996, Favorite Brands purchased the Sathers  Company and the Farley Food Company.

Kidd Marshmallows

Kidd marshmallows.jpg

Also in 1996, Kidd & Company was purchased. Kidd was the second largest marshmallow and marshmallow creme manufacturer in the U.S. with sales of over $32 million in 1995. Favorite Brands had now purchased the top two marshmallow producers in North America.

 

Founded in 1895 by Albert Eugene Kidd, it initially produced a wide array of products including face powders, roasted peanuts and lemon drops. In 1917, the company began manufacturing marshmallows. By 1938 Kidd & Company had concentrated its focus on the marshmallow business, and especially marshmallow creme. It used a casting method of production, pouring marshmallows individually in molds. In 1947, they opened a 14,000-square-foot (1,300 m2) plant in Ligonier, Indiana. In 1948, shortly after Kidd brought their new plant online, Alex Doumakes patented a new, more efficient process for producing marshmallows using extrusion. This method forced a rope of marshmallow through a die under pressure, which was then cut into the bite-sized pieces familiar today. Alex Doumakes later started his own marshmallow company. Kidd's plant was dated and expanded over the following years and ultimately grew to be 110,000 square feet (10,000 m2).

 

In 1987, Kidd & Company built an additional plant west of the Rocky Mountains, in Henderson, Nevada. This plant was 118,000 square feet (11,000 m2) and was destroyed on May 4, 1988 when the PEPCON rocket fuel plant located next to it exploded.[25] Rebuilt with more space in 1989, it continued as the west coast manufacturing and distribution point for Kidd & Company, and became a popular tourist attraction as well. Today the specially designed building with its clean rooms is used by the Clark County Maintenance department. After Kraft gained control of Favorite Brands and this plant in 2000, the manufacturing equipment was relocated to Kraft's plant in Kendallville, Indiana.

Kidd's Ligonier plant was closed by Favorite Brands in 1996 and production moved to the former Kraft plant located less than 30 miles (48 km) away in Kendallville, Indiana.[26][27]

Ligonier, Indiana still celebrates the Kidd Marshmallow production heritage with a Marshmallow Festival each year, even though marshmallows are no longer produced there.[28]

Dae Julie acquisition

DaeJulie wiki.jpg

In early 1997, Dae Julie was purchased. Dae Julie was founded in 1963 as a  importer by David Babiarz.[29] In 1990, Mr. Babiarz went on to start a new business and built a new plant to sport it. The new business registered as land, and the new facility was a 120,000-square-foot (11,000 m2) state-of-the-art manufacturing plant located in the Chicago suburb of Des Plaines, Illinois. The primary product focus of land was Gummy candies for which demand was rapidly rising, though the starch-molding equipment could be used for a wide range of products. A trademark search revealed 30 other companies using the name land, so the decision was made to use the Dae Julie name on land products.[30] At the time of its acquisition in early 1997 by Favorite Brands, it was considered one of the top Gummy manufacturers in the country, with annual sales of over $40 million (at manufacturer prices). Overall retail sales of Gummy products was estimated to be between $150 million and $175 million in the year of acquisition, with Nabisco's Gummi Savers accounting for $40 million of that total (at retail).[31] Trolli, Farley  and Ferrara Pan were the other large producers at the time for the U.S. market.

 

North American Trolli acquisition

Main article: Trolli

 

Later in 1997, the North American operations of Trolli Gummies was added.

 

Gummy Bears were originally developed by Hans Riegel Sr. of Bonn, Germany in 1922. He then started the Haribo (acronym for Hans Rigel, Bonn) company to produce the little rubber bears.

A different German  company was started in 1948 by Willi Mederer. Originally the company was named Wilmed, but in 1975 the name was changed to Trolli. The company developed Gummy Worms in 1981 and sold them under the Trolli brand name, using a rainbow-haired Troll as their mascot. In 1986, to expand its market and lower its shipping costs, Mederer began producing Trolli-branded gummies in a plant located in the U.S. in Creston, Iowa.

Favorite Brands purchased the Trolli U.S. manufacturing facility in 1997 and licensed the Trolli name from Mederer for use in the United States. [27] The license applies only to North American sales. An example of a different Trolli license holder is TREXCO.

Favorite Brands

Fbi emblem wiki.jpg

In 1995, Favorite Brands was formed to purchase the largest United States manufacturer of marshmallow products. Then, in 1996, it purchased the second-largest manufacturer of marshmallow products.

 

By the end of 1996, Favorite Brands enjoyed the number-one market position in branded marshmallow products, including the Jet-Puffed marshmallow brand, which had a 79% share of the branded marshmallow market and a 47% share of the total marshmallow market. In addition, Favorite Brands was the market leader in the ingredient marshmallow category, selling dehydrated marshmallow bits to every major cereal manufacturer in the United States, and was believed to have a 98% share of that market.

 

In 1996, Favorite Brands' Fruit Snack business held the number-two market position with a 22% market share and it was the second-largest general-line  splier in the United States. The Sathers product line was the leading brand sold in convenience stores across the country.

 

With the 1997 addition of Trolli and Dae Julie, Favorite Brands held the number two market position in the gummi market; Trolli having a 15% share.[32]

 

By the end of 1997, Favorite Brands was the distant, fourth-largest confectionery company in the United States. At that time, only Hershey, Nestle and Mars were larger.[8][33] With total annual sales of over $750 million,[32] with leading brands and products in most of its sales categories, how did Favorite Brands go bankrt within 3 years?[34]

 

The president and CEO of FBI, Al Bono, formerly CEO of California Gold Dairy Products of Petaluma, California, was quoted as saying: "Business is business, whether it's dairy or chocolate confections or selling lamps". David Bonderman, speaking for TPG which had invested $512 million in the venture, was later quoted to say that Favorite Brands was one of the worst investments his gro had ever funded.[35][36] Favorite Brands was TPG's first major investment in the food and beverage industry.[27]

 

Before coming together under the Favorite Brands umbrella, the individual companies were mostly privately owned, with their owners taking a daily, hands-on interest in their operations.[37] Under Favorite Brands' ownership, the companies were stripped of these owners and they were replaced with a management team that had little experience in confections or consolidating the operations of acquisitions.[8] The first management gro was replaced by an interim set of management.[32] This interim management was then replaced within a year by still another gro. The parallels with the recent experiences at E.J. Brach's (see section below) were striking: rapidly changing per management[38]...3 CEO's at Favorite Brands in as many years; a disconnect with customers and their needs...reducing promotional sport and product choice; a marked increase in overhead expenses, including a large office complex, as well as increased spending for financing and consultants.

 

FBI was the market leader in the ingredient marshmallow category...dehydrated marshmallow bits that are used in cereals and hot beverages, selling bits to every major cereal manufacturer in the United States and believed to have a 98% share of that market.

The deal seems to have been structured so that the investors' options would remain open: one option being to hold the investment briefly and then flip it, either as a whole or by spinning off the acquired components. Another option was to take the company public. The stated option was to operate the companies so that their synergies could be tapped to reduce the costs of production and distribution sufficiently to offset the ongoing financing expenses associated with the formation of Favorite Brands. While Texas Pacific may have ultimately hoped to take the company public, it became apparent that Favorite Brands' roll strategy was fundamentally flawed. The company paid too much for its assets and took on too much debt. The acquisitions did not mesh well together, having different operations, different products, and different customers-thus leading to severe difficulties in integrating the operations and achieving any benefits from the company's size. Systems and reporting were quickly integrated, but getting the various Operations, Sales, Marketing and Distribution components working together presented an ongoing problem. When key executives from acquired companies left, Favorite Brands lost an incalculable amount of trade relations and knowledge of the  business, which had a debilitating effect on business. Some orders were now delivered late or only partially filled, providing an opening for competitors to seize all-important shelf space.[8] Another common experience Favorite Brands shared with the travails which Brach's had endured was the loss of a well-known brand name; Favorite Brands was to lose the 'Kraft' name on its packaging effective October 1997.[23][39] In addition, Favorite Brands' products were facing ever-increasing competition from competitors such as Brach's, including in the heretofore high-margin Fruit Snack and Gummi product lines.[40]

 

As cash balances dwindled, Texas Pacific Gro was asked to contribute additional funds for operations.[32] It was not until 1998, three years after the formation of Favorite Brands and facing bankrtcy, that 12 surplus distribution centers were closed.[32] Consultants from Bain, hired to explain the business to management and to help them plan a course of action also consumed millions of dollars of limited cash flow, while actually accomplishing little.[32] Under prior private ownership, a layer of consultants explaining the business was rarely needed. Financing costs continued to be a drain on resources.[32]

 

There was also a culture clash. The brands acquired from Kraft relied on a well-known brand name to drive sales. This culture did not mesh with the brands which sold product based on consumer value.[41] This too was a problem which Brach's had faced, whether to pursue branded or commodity sales. The sales forces of Sathers, Farley's, and Trolli remained separate from those selling the former Kraft brands, never combining to handle "Favorite Brands" products for all customers. Again, there were few actual synergies realized under the combined umbrella of "Favorite Brands".[42]

 

In the end, the continued separation of the acquired operations allowed them to be sold easily. Nabisco purchased Favorite Brands in November 1999, and by February, 2000 had announced plans to close the headquarters,[43] then located in Bannockburn, Illinois, and move the functions and duties to its own Parsippany, New Jersey headquarters. Nabisco was purchased itself in June, 2000 and merged with Kraft. After the merger of Kraft and Nabisco, the components of Favorite Brands were sold off, absorbed, or held briefly for later disposal. The Farley and Sathers operations, which included plants, distribution centers and headquarters were sold, with the Farley's Fruit Snack line and production facility being retained. The Fruit Snack business line was eventually sold to Kellogg.[44] Trolli was sold separately, with its plant and headquarters, to Wrigley in 2005. The marshmallow business was absorbed back into Kraft. Unfortunately, the value of the component pieces of Favorite Brands did not equal the price paid. Nabisco purchased Favorite Brands for $475 million in cash in 1999,[45] far less than the approximately $700 million paid to acquire and fund operations of Favorite Brands by its investors.[32][34]

 

Farley's and Sathers

Farley's and Sathers, as an independent company, was formed in January 2002 in Round Lake, Minnesota from assets purchased from Kraft Foods.[8] At the time, 2001 sales of the brands and products acquired, were estimated to be $220 million. Included in the sale were trademarks, Sathers Trucking and main distribution facility. Also included in the sale were six other facilities including three Farley production plants, one of which was actually the former Dae Julie plant located in Des Plaines, Illinois.[46] Since then it has continued to acquire the brands and businesses of others.

 

Brands purchased from Hershey

Henry Heide

Main article: Heide  Company

Jujube

freshly picked jujube fruits

Jujyfruits

In May, 2002, Farley & Sathers acquired several other brands from Hershey.

 

Known for products such as Jujyfruits, Jujubes, Dollars, and Gummi Bears, it was founded by its namesake[5] Henry Heide[47] in 1869. In 1920 "juju" candies were introduced: Jujyfruits and Jujubes. The only real difference between Jujubes and Jujyfruits, other than the shape, is that Jujubes use potato starch instead of corn starch as their primary thickener and Jujubes are cured longer, making them firmer.

 

Both candies originally used Ju-Ju Gum as an ingredient, which is similar to many of the other vegetable gums such as Gum Arabic, Acacia, Agar or Guar used within the confectionery industry. Ju-Ju gum comes from the Jujube tree, which produces date-like fruits. Today, corn syr is the primary ingredient.[48] The Jujyfruits shapes are Pineapple, Tomato, Raspberry, Grape Bundle, Asparagus, Banana, and Pea Pod. The banana shape is stamped with "HEIDE". Flavors include raspberry, licorice, lime, orange, and lemon.

 

In the 1930s, "Red Hot Dollars" were developed. "Red Hot" being 30s slang for a "dollar". Hot cinnamon flavor was not available until after Farley's and Sathers purchased the brand from Hershey. Prior to that, the flavor had been a mild raspberry.

 

In 1995 Hershey purchased the New Brunswick, New Jersey-based Henry Heide  Inc. from the family.[49] Farley and Sathers purchased the brands in June, 2002 from Hershey, when they had an estimated $40 million in annual sales.[5]

 

Chuckles

Main article: Chuckles

Chuckles wiki.jpg

 

 

 

Also in May, 2002, the new Farley & Sathers company acquired the Chuckles brand from Hershey.

 

Demonstrating once again the intertwined nature of the industry, Chuckles was developed by Fred W. Amend, who at one time worked for the Heide  Company. He began working for Henry Heide in 1875 in New York, a period when Heide was concentrating on the production of almond paste. After a series of other jobs in the  industry, he moved to Danville, Illinois in 1921 and started his own Amend Company to produce marshmallow. Later that same year he began producing a jelly . It was Fred's wife, Tulita, who suggested the name of the product. "All  bars at that time were chocolate. But what if you didn't want chocolate? Our jelly bar was the answer." She dubbed them Chuckles because the name suggested enjoyment. Even during the Depression, when people couldn't afford more expensive treats, they bought Chuckles, she said.[50]

 

The Amend Company was sold to Nabisco in 1970. In 1986, Nabisco sold the company and manufacturing plant to a newly formed company of local investors and former Nabisco employees for $10 million. The Chuckles brand name and licensing rights were sold separately to Leaf Inc., a unit of Huhtamaki Oy of Helsinki, Finland. The Danville production plant was renamed Tempo Confections and began manufacturing products under contract for others.

 

In 1996, Hershey acquired the Chuckles brand and license when it purchased Huhtamaki Oy's Leaf, Inc. confection business.

 

Amazin' Fruit

 

Purchased from Hershey in May 2002, this product was introduced by Hershey ten years earlier as a heavily promoted attempt to gain a foothold in the growing market for gummy candies. It was designed to compete with the Trolli brand as well as other gummy brands. It included real fruit juice (much like Farley fruit snacks) and came in bear shapes. Later the shapes were changed to fruit designs. During a cross-promotion with the film Jurassic Park: The Lost World dinosaur designs were sold as well.[51]

 

Brands purchased from Kraft

Now and Later

Main article: Now and Later

 

Purchased from Kraft late in 2002, this product was introduced in 1962. The name was a suggestion for its customers that they eat some of the squares right away and save the rest for later. The old ad slogan for the  was, "Eat some now, Save some for Later", later replaced by, "Hard 'N Fruity now and Soft 'N Chewy Later". The later slogan describing the ’s consistency over time.

 

Charles Cari learned to make toffee while working for W.F. Schrafft's & Sons in Boston. In 1919, Cari moved to New York to begin his own  business in Brooklyn. He sold his business to father and son Harry and Joseph Klein in 1953 for $25,000. They named their company Phoenix  Company. At the time, their product line was salt water taffy, peanut brittle, and Halloween . It was a very seasonal business and concentrated mainly around Halloween. Now and Later was developed as a product which could be sold year-round. The Kleins invested in new equipment and technology and expanded distribution nationwide, growing the company to the point where production was running two shifts per day, six days per week.[52]

 

The Kleins sold the Phoenix  Company to Beatrice Foods in 1978. In 1983, it was sold to Huhtamäki Oyj of Helsinki, Finland, which previously purchased the Leaf  Company. The two acquisitions were merged under the name Leaf, Inc. In turn, Leaf, Inc. sold the Phoenix  Company to Kouri Capital, a Finnish investment firm, who changed the name to Phoenix Confections in 1986. In 1992, Kouri sold Phoenix Confections to Nabisco[53] and then in 2000 Kraft acquired the Now and Later brand as part of its purchase of Nabisco.[52]

 

The original flavors were Red, Green and Blue. Under Beatrice Foods, these flavors became Strawberry, Apple and Grape. For April Fools' Day 1983, three special flavors were released: Broiled Salmon, Chicken-Fried Steak and Huevos Rancheros.

 

Intense Fruit Chews

Purchased from Kraft late in 2002, this was originally part of Nabisco's Lifesavers brand of confections. Kraft gained control of this product when it purchased Nabisco in 2000.

Gum brands purchased from Hershey

RainBlo

Main article: Rain-Blo

 

RainBlo bubble gum was created by Leaf Confectionery in 1940; featuring an unusual hollow center, it was the first gumball to have flavoring inside. RainBlo was the first bubble gum that allowed chewers to blow colored bubbles.[54] Along with several other Leaf brands, it was sold in 1967 to W.R. Grace, then was reacquired by Leaf in 1983. Huhtamaki Oy acquired RainBlo when it bought Leaf in 1983. Hershey then bought Leaf in 1996.[8]

 

Fruit Stripe

Main article: Fruit Stripe

Fruit Stripe was established in the early 1960s as Fruit Stripe Zebra, part of the Beech-Nut gum line.[8] Fruit Stripe gum was purchased by Hershey in 2000 as part of a larger gum brand acquisition of Nabisco products.

Hot Dog!

Main article: Hot Dog!

Purchased from Hershey in 2003 as part of a four-brand gum purchase, Hot Dog! gum is a small sausage shaped gumball with either a cherry or (hot) cinnamon flavored shell. As a novelty item, it can often be found in ballparks and at hot dog stands.

Ser Bubble

Main article: Ser Bubble

Ser Bubble was developed by the Thomas Weiner Company shortly after World War II in the 1940s. The five-cent product was a huge success, but in the face of increased competition, the company brought out a one-cent version in 1948. General Mills acquired Ser Bubble in 1969. The gum line was later sold to Leaf and was acquired by Hershey in the 1996 acquisition of Leaf.[8]

Bobs Candies

Main article: Bobs Candies

 

Ranked as the largest  cane maker in the world, Bobs Candies was formed in 1919 by Bob McCormack in Albany, Georgia. Originally called the Famous  Company, the name was changed to the Mills-McCormack  Company when Bob Mills bought out the other investors and began working on the administrative side of the company. In 1924, the name was changed to Bobs' . In 1933, the apostrophe was dropped and the company became known as Bobs  Company.

 

Initially, coconut, peanut, stick, and hard candies were sold, as well as taffy. Chocolate and pecan candies products were then added to the company's product line. Pecan candies, later were marketed as "Bobs Pe-Kons" and "Bobs Pe-Kon-ettes," became a mainstay product until World War II. On February 11, 1940, a tornado destroyed the factory but within 6 months, the plant was rebuilt and was producing again.

 

 

Bobs canes wiki.jpg

 

 

 

Hard candies were popular during the late 1940s, but high humidity in southern Georgia caused production, shipping and shelf-life problems. Production issues were addressed in 1946 by installing large air conditioners to de-humidify the company's wrapping room. Shelf-life and shipping issues were addressed in 1949 with a new machine that sealed  stick in moisture-proof wrappers. Increasing production rates via automating the production was accomplished with a creation of Father Harding Keller, a Roman Catholic priest of the Diocese of Little Rock, and McCormack's brother-in-law. Fr. Keller first invented a machine to dispense ribbons of peanut butter on the company's peanut butter crackers. In 1950, Keller invented a machine that twisted soft  into the spiral striping that defined the look of  canes and then cutting the canes in precise lengths. Fr. Keller patented his invention, the Keller Machine[55] Fr. Keller and his machine gained national fame in the 1960s when he was a contestant on the popular TV show What's My Line.[56]

 

Bobs  occied approximately 100,000 square feet (9,300 m2) spread across 6 buildings in downtown Albany. In 1967, construction began on a new 130,000-square-foot (12,000 m2) facility that doubled the production capacity of the company. This new facility was expanded several times, and by the end of the 1970s had doubled production capacity yet again.

 

In 1984, a second production facility was opened in Kingston, Jamaica. The 13,000-square-foot (1,200 m2) plant produced unwrapped, pure-sugar stick .

 

In 1985, Bobs Candies acquired a competitor, Fine , which had $4 million in annual sales at the time.

 

In 1994 another 175,000 square feet (16,300 m2) was added to the Georgia production facility to address capacity issues.

 

By 2001, Bobs Candies was producing 500 million  canes per year at its Georgia facility. Half of that production was moved to Mexico between 2001 and 2004 to take advantage of lower sugar prices outside the United States.[57]

 

In 2005, Farley and Sathers acquired Bobs  Company. By the end of 2005, all of the Albany, Georgia operations of Bobs  had been shut down and all production was moved to production facilities in Mexico.[58][59] [60]

 

North American Trolli re-acquisition

As a component of Favorite Brands, Trolli became part of Nabisco in 1999, then part of Kraft in 2000.

 

In 2004, under Kraft ownership, Trolli introduced a gummi  in the shape of chickens, squirrels, and snakes with tire tracks on them, making them to appear as though they'd been run over by a vehicle. Marketed as Roadkill , animal rights activists spoke out about the  in an effort to get it off of the market. The product was taken off store shelves and discontinued.[61]

 

In 2005, Kraft sold Trolli to Wrigley as part of a $1.48 billion offloading of  businesses.[62] Included in the sale to Wrigley were such iconic brands as Altoids and Lifesavers, in addition to smaller, local brands such as Trolli.[63] Wrigley subsequently sold off Trolli from this gro to Farley and Sathers  in the same year.[64]

Brach and Brock

Brock  Company

 

William E. Brock settled down in Chattanooga, Tennessee in 1906 and bought a small wholesale grocery shop, which sold  produced on the premises by the Trigg  company. This  operation consisted of handmade penny and bulk candies, peanut brittle, peppermints and fudge. The name was changed to Brock  in 1909.

 

In the early 1920s, a major expansion occurred when the company modernized its 120,000-square-foot (11,000 m2) factory with the installation of automatic (starch) moguls. Brock then eliminated all slab-produced products such as peanut brittle and fudge and concentrated on jelly and marshmallow candies, which were produced, in his new mogul equipment. Later in the decade, Brock became one of the first  manufacturers to package its products in cellophane bags. In the 1930s, Brock introduced what would become one of its biggest sellers for the next 60 years, Chocolate Covered Cherries. In the 1940s, during World War II, Brock introduced the Brock Bar, a coated nut roll using corn syr and peanuts, during a period when sugar was strictly rationed.[65]

 

In the 1950s, Brock added 60,000 square feet (5,600 m2) to its plant in downtown Chattanooga. By the end of the decade though, additional space for expansion was needed, so a 30-acre (120,000 m2) site on the outskirts of Chattanooga was purchased. On this site in 1964, Brock added a 64,000-square-foot (5,900 m2) distribution center, expanding the warehouse another 25,000 square feet (2,300 m2) by the end of the 1960s.[65]

 

In 1976, the company moved its production to a new facility on its 30-acre (120,000 m2) site on the outskirts of Chattanooga.

 

In 1978, the Brock  Company purchased the Winona, Minnesota  company, Schuler Chocolates. Located in a cooler and less humid area of the country, the Schuler Chocolates company itself was an amalgam of several  companies, including the maker of the Chicken Dinner  bar, originally created by Milwaukee-based Sperry  Company. The name was meant to convey a sense of wealth and prosperity à la "a chicken in every pot" (another of Sperry's big sellers was the Club Sandwich bar.) Sperry was bought out by Pearson's  in 1962; in 1967 it was sold to Schuler Chocolates (which itself was the originator of the corn-flake-spiked Duck Lunch bar). Schuler Chocolates also owned the Milky Way bar, which at its core, is made with a variant of Minnesota nougat developed by makers in the early decades of the 20th century, before selling the rights to the Mars  Company.[66]

 

In the 1980s, Brock added gummy candies and fruit snacks to its product offerings. It also began contract and industrial production of its fruit based products.

 

In 1990, Brock purchased the Shelly Brothers, Inc.  company of Souderton, Pennsylvania, which held a 1966 patent for molding traditional clear .[67] In 1993, Brock bought a 30% share in Clara  of Dublin, Ireland with plans for expansion into the European market.[65] By then, Brock had become a publicly traded company, with an initial public offering of 2.3 million shares for almost 63% of the company's stock.[68]

E.J. Brach's

Main article: Brach's Confections

 

Founded in 1904 by Emil Brach, he invested his life savings, $1,000, in a storefront  store. He named it "Brach's Palace of Sweets" and it was located at the corner of North Avenue and Towne Street in Chicago, Illinois. With his sons Edwin and Frank, he started with one kettle. Investing in additional equipment he was able to lower his production costs and sell his  for 20 cents per pound, well below the more typical 50 cents per pound his competitors were charging. By 1911 his production had reached 50,000 pounds per week.[54]

 

By 1923, Brach had 4 factories operating at capacity. Brach then invested $5 million in a new factory, beginning construction in 1921. It was designed by Alfred S. Alschuler, built at 4656 West Kinzie Street, and consolidated production into one building. At the time, they were producing 127 different varieties of  and had a capacity of 2,225,000 pounds per week. Over the years, this new plant was expanded and investments in new processes and equipment were made, including its own chocolate grinding plant and a large panning operation. In 1948, after an electrical spark ignited corn starch, a massive explosion on the plant's third floor killed 11 employees and injured 18. Much of the factory's north side was destroyed. Reconstruction brought the plant's capacity  to more than 4 million pounds of product per year, and it employed 2,400 workers,[54] in 2,200,000 square feet (200,000 m2). It was recognized as the largest  manufacturing plant in the world at the time.[39] At its peak, 4,500 employees worked there. The plant was eventually abandoned in 2003 when new owners took over operations (see below) and production was moved primarily to Mexico. An administrative building was blown  for a special effects scene in 2008's The Dark Knight Batman movie (filmed in August, 2007),[69] the rest of the complex was demolished in 2014 and currently remains vacant land.

 

Prior to World War II, Brach's produced several  bars, including a chocolate-covered, honeycombed, peanut butter Swing Bar as well as a mint and almond nougat bar. After the war Brach's concentrated on bulk and bagged candies. It was in the period after the war that Halloween Trick or Treating became a popular activity. Brach's promoted its  corn and other fall-themed candies, available in single-serve, pre-packaged packets.[54]

 

In 1958 Brach's introduced the Pick-A-Mix concept. Customers could choose from a wide selection of products, scooping items of their choosing, and paying one price per pound. This was adapted from the barrels seen in general stores at the time.[54] This concept brought the dying experience of buying  at the local corner store into the new merchandiers, the sermarkets.

 

In 1966, American Home Products Corporation purchased the company. In 1986, the last year of ownership by American Home Products, it accounted for two-thirds of the U.S. market for bagged  and 7% of the $9 billion U.S.  market. It employed 3,700 and had an estimated pretax profit of more than $75 million[70][71] on sales of $640 million.

 

In 1987 Jacobs Suchard Limited, a Swiss chocolate and coffee conglomerate, purchased the company for $730 million and by the end of 1989, it was in serious trouble. Losses that year were an estimated $50 million and sales had decreased to $470 million. By 1993, sales had dropped to $400 million though losses were reduced somewhat to $26 million. All this occurred during a period when overall per capita  consumption in the U.S. had increased 25%. By May, 1994, after 7 years of Suchard ownership, Brach's had had 9 different CEOs, moved its headquarters from the plant property to a penthouse office in one of Chicago's wealthiest suburbs, saw a lost of nearly 900 jobs (42% of the workforce at that time), and suffered a loss of key customers and market share.[39][72]

 

Klaus Jacobs almost immediately fired Brach's top officers and gutted the leadership of its sales, marketing, production and finance departments. Some of these positions were filled with executives from Suchard's European operations; people with little experience in the  industry (see: Favorite Brands above).[68] Former executives cited Jacobs Suchard's autocratic management style and inability to recognize the difference between American and European  consumption habits. The name of the company was changed to Jacobs Suchard Inc., a name few retailers or consumers recognized and product lines were trimmed from 1,700 to 400 in an attempt to cut costs.[39] This alienated many of its largest customers, including Walgreens and Walmart, who found other sources, including Farley . In addition to the cuts in product selection, Brach's also chose to curtail holiday promotional activities.[71][73]

 

In 1990, Phillip Morris purchased Jacobs Suchard for $3.8 billion, except for its U.S. subsidiary, E. J. Brach Corp. A holding company named Van Houten & Zoon Holding AG was formed by Klaus Jacobs to run Brach and other businesses. Disagreements with Klaus Jacobs on marketing and management strategies continued, particularly over commodity vs. branded (Brach's) products. In 1993 alone, Brach's saw 3 different CEO's, and continued to experience a high rate of turnover and dismissals within the sales and marketing departments. Many of Brach's sales personnel left to work for its competitors.;[74]

 

In September 1994, E.J. Brach's purchased the Brock  Company of Chattanooga for $140 million, a year in which Brock  had sales of $112 million and profits of $6.5 million. This was the second attempt by the two companies to join together. The first time had been while E.J. Brach's was under American Home Products ownership. The merger attempt at that time was canceled due to concerns of an antitrust suit.

 

For a time the new company operated as the Brach and Brock  Company. This was later changed to Brach's Confections.

 

In 2003, Barry Callebaut AG purchased the new company. The principal owner of Brach's, KJ Jacobs AG, was also a majority stakeholder in Barry Callebaut. As part of the deal, Barry Callebaut agreed to assume $16 million in debt, fund restructuring efforts for 5 years and paid a symbolic $1 (one dollar) for the company.

 

Brach's Confections acquisition

 

On September 17, 2007, Barry Callebaut AG announced its intention to sell Brach's Confections to Farley's & Sathers.[75] The acquisition was completed on November 16, 2007 for an undisclosed amount.[76] Barry Callebaut AG shares rose over 1 percent on the day the deal was announced, outperforming weaker markets that day. "We think the Brach's disposal is a very positive move, as it will greatly improve the gro and consumer division margins," said Vontobel analyst Rene Weber. Weber also estimated that Barry Callebaut had not made a gain on the sale and estimated that Brach's was worth some 30 million francs on its books (approximately $16 million in U.S. Dollars). "The purchase price will be no higher than that, meaning no extraordinary gain for the company," Weber said. At the time, Brach's had been struggling with rising competition and a stalling  market in the U.S. Their annual gross sales were approximately $270 million, with sugar  making  around 75 percent of revenue and chocolate products accounting for around 25 percent.[77]

 

The acquisition moved Farley's & Sathers into the top 25 international  companies and brought with it Brach's existing fruit snack business, a return to chocolate products and other general-line  products.[78][79]

 

In 2008, the first year for the newly expanded company, sales were reported to be $590 million and 42 million pounds.[80]

Ferrara Pan

Main article: Ferrara  Company

 

The company is headed by a third generation of the Ferrara family. The grandfather, Salvatore Ferrara, came from Nola, Italy to New York in 1899 at the age of 15. The Ferrara family had been bakers in Italy. In 1908 he opened a bakery at 772 W. Taylor, in the heart of Chicago's "Little Italy" neighborhood. He sold -coated almonds known as "confetti" (also known as Jordan almonds), a popular treat at Italian weddings. When  sales became greater than pastries, Ferrara partnered with two brothers-in-law, Salvatore Buffardi and Anello Pagano. They built a two-story brick building at 2200 W. Taylor and began producing a variety of panned candies.

 

The second floor of the building was devoted to the revolving kettles that produced the pan , with all of the machines being driven by a giant wheel. The  was dropped to the shipping department below through a hole in the floor.

 

Nello Ferrara, the second generation of the family in the business, served as a military attorney and was involved with the war crimes trials in Japan in 1946. It was his visit to that devastated country that inspired the creation of Atomic Fireballs in 1954. 15 million are consumed weekly.

 

The company moved to a former dairy in Forest Park in 1959 where it remains to this day.

 

Inspiration for the Lemonhead name came from Salvatore Ferrara seeing his grandson, Salvatore II, the third generation, after delivery. Salvatore II was a forceps baby and he noted that his new grandson's head was lemon-shaped. Lemonhead candies were introduced in 1962. Ferrara now makes 500 million Lemonheads per year.[81]

 

With the success of Lemonheads, the company expanded the fruit  line with Cherry Chan, packaged in a box with a picture of an mustachioed, sinister-looking Asian. Alexander the Grape and Mister Melon soon followed. Bowing to some protest, and to create a common naming convention for the similar products, the names were changed: to Cherryheads, Grapeheads, and Melonheads, respectively.[82][83]

 

In addition to the above products, Ferrara also produced Jawbreakers, Boston Baked Beans, Red Hots (cinnamon imperials), Long Fellers (panned licorice pieces), Gr-r-r-oats, and a minty chewing gum called Try-umph.[82]

 

In addition to sales of their own products, Ferrara Pan also acted as a distributor for products such as Kraft Toblerone Chocolates. When Kraft ended that relationship in 2008, Ferrara invested more than $20 million in 2009 to develop and distribute its own version of a product with very similar packaging and characteristics of the lost Toblerone line.[84][85]

The son of Salvatore Ferrara II was seen as the successor of his father at the business. The son, named for his grandfather Nello, was a minor league hockey player, with a desk in the company's headquarters.[84][86]

 

Leslie Dashew, a partner with the Aspen Family Business Gro and author of "The Keys to Family Business Success," said succession planning from founder to second generation is particularly challenging but can be hard for any generation, particularly if the leader becomes "very identified with the business."

 

Such leaders, she said, "talk the talk and say, 'This a family business, we have members working here.' But they don't operate that way. It's like it's their fiefdom."

 

That may be fine for shareholders if the business is doing well. - "If you go through tough economic times, people may question that very powerful leader," Dashew said. "If things are going well, they might say, 'He's a genius.' But if they're not, (shareholders) may question things that were taken for granted, and then the power base is questioned."

 

Another common problem is separating personal and professional relationships.

 

"There are disparate value systems in the world of business and in the world of family," said Paul Karofsky, CEO of Transition Consulting Gro. "In family, we're expected to grant unconditional love and appreciate each other and value each other for who they are, and in business we value for what they do and how well they do it."

 

These value systems are "inherently incompatible," Kanofsky said. "And, as a result, this is one of the reasons why family businesses face so many more complex issues than nonfamily enterprises."

 

He added that "survival to the fourth or fifth generation is remarkable."[87]

 

After a hundred years in business, the families controlling the company had grown in numbers, and splintered in what they wanted from the company. Dividends, capital appreciation, positions for themselves and family members, and/or power and prestige.[88] It was finding a way to satisfy these varying wants and needs that would consume the greatest amount of time and effort in making a deal to sell the company.[89]

 

Ferrara Pan  acquisition

 

In May, 2011 Salvatore Ferrara II was asked to leave a board meeting. Police were called and Mr. Ferrara left voluntarily.[87] Mr. Ferrara then called the police himself when he noted that the board had apparently re-convened without him.[90] In the summer of 2011, Mr. Ferrara broached the idea of a merger to Liam Killeen, then CEO of Farley's & Sathers.[89]

 

In May, 2012 the Ferrara Pan  brands were added to the existing Farley's & Sathers roster of brands. The acquisition was partially funded with a $425 million term loan due in June, 2018. In addition, $330 million in additional equity was contributed by Catterton Partners and Ferrara Pan . In addition to the term loan and equity contributions, a $125 million line of credit was opened, due in 2017.[91]

 

In May, 2013 Moody's downgraded the loan due to concerns that the highly leveraged company was experiencing lower than projected sales volumes, higher distribution costs, and delays in achieving the synergies needed.[92]

 

Shortly after the acquisition it was announced that the former Sathers headquarters in Round Lake, Minnesota (population, less than 400), which had employed over 200 workers in 2010,[93] would be closed and that the new headquarters would be located in Oakbrook Terrace, Illinois. Also slated for closing was one of two facilities located in Chattanooga, Tennessee, which traced its history back to Brock . The Sathers Trucking business was also scheduled to cease operations.[94]

 

In July, 2012 a 10-year lease was signed for space on multiple floors (25th and 27th) of a 31 story office tower in Oakbrook Terrace (the tallest in the Western suburbs of Chicago).[95]

 

In an interview with the new CEO, Salvatore Ferrara II, it was stated that at the time of acquisition, Ferrara Pan had $350 million in annual sales and that Farley's & Sathers had $650 million, for a combined total of $1 billion.[89]

 

Per Moody's, pro-forma revenues for the twelve months ended December 31, 2012 were approximately $823 million.[92]

 

In February, 2014 Mr. Ferrara announced his resignation as CEO of the company, ending 106 years of family control of the business. The information was publicly released in the following month.[96][97]

 

In May, 2014 the company's debt was again downgraded by Moody's, due largely to the company's weak financial metrics, which included high leverage and a weakened liquidity profile. Operating performance in FY13 was well below Moody's expectations, who also noted that synergy savings are taking longer than expected to be realized. Relatively weak profit margins and negative free cash flow-to-debt also contributed to the downgrade.[98]

 

In March, 2015, the company added $40 million to its $425 million term loan, bringing the amount due in June, 2018 to $465 million. Moody's rated this a Moderate Credit Negative, but did not change its overall rating of the debt. Net sales (unaudited) for the 12 months ended December 31, 2014 were reported to be $870 million.[99]

 

Ferrara , née Farley's & Sathers, today

 

Ferrara  is a  manufacturing company headquartered in Oakbrook Terrace, Illinois. Ferrara  currently operates 11 manufacturing plants in the US and Mexico, as well as distribution centers around the US.

 

The company sells 92% of all mallowcremes in the US; it is the largest producer of  canes; the largest seller of conversation hearts; produces virtually all of the jelly beans that are consumed in the United States. The company has 21 starch moguls, of 40 in the US as a whole. The company has between 700 and 800 pans operating at any given time...it is believed that no other US company has more than 150.[89] It is claimed that the company produces a million pounds of gummy  per week in 4 manufacturing plants, 2 in the US and 2 in Mexico.[100] The company employs approximately 1,000 people.

 

Culled from the efforts and innovations of numerous individuals who built and grew their products, processes, and companies; at their combined peaks these production companies had once utilized more than 5,000,000 square feet (460,000 m2), and employed more than 10,000 workers. Today the company is a set of brand names and products, owned by an investment company.

 

Timeline

1860s Henry Heide  Company begins business

1890s Farley  Company established

1900s Brach's Candies begins production in the backroom of a Chicago store. Brock's  of Chattanooga begins production of penny candies, peanut brittle and jelly candies.

1920s Bobs Candies is formed

1930s Sathers  Company begins operations

1960s Dae Julie begins business as an importer, later as a manufacturer

1980s Trolli Gummis begins production in the U.S.

1994 Brach's  purchases a controlling interest in Brock's  of Chattanooga

1995 Favorite Brands International created with purchase of Kraft Caramel, Marshmallow, Dinner Mints and Peanut Brittle businesses. Henry Heide, Inc is sold to Hershey Foods.

1996 Favorite Brands International acquires Farley Foods, Sathers  and Kidd Marshmallow businesses

1997 Favorite Brands International acquires Dae Julie and the Trolli Gummi businesses

1999 Nabisco buys Favorite Brands International

2000 Nabisco is merged with Kraft Foods by Phillip Morris

2002 Catterton Partners form Farleys & Sathers  Company made  of assets from the former Farley Foods, Sathers  Company, and the Kraft Taffy business from Kraft; Chuckles and several other Henry Heide brands purchased from Hershey Foods.

2003 Catterton Partners continues its acquisitions with the purchase of 4 old-line gum lines from Hershey Foods.

2005 Catterton Partners buys the Trolli Gummi business, which had been part of the Favorite Brands gro of products, from Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company, which had acquired it as part of a larger gro of businesses from Kraft. Bob's Candies is acquired.

2007 Catterton Partners buys the Brach & Brock  Company

2012 Catterton Partners buys the Ferrara Pan  Company and renames the new entity Ferrara

 

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